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 Are You Coffee Curious?

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Javabee

Javabee

Posts : 811
Join date : 2013-09-08
Age : 63
Location : Seattle

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PostSubject: Are You Coffee Curious?   Are You Coffee Curious? EmptyWed Sep 03, 2014 11:40 pm

Craving a Few Factoids to Quench your Coffee Curiosity? 

Legend of the Dancing Goats: 
Legend has it that coffee was discovered by a goatherd in Ethiopia name Kaldi. He noticed his goats dancing and carrying on after eating the berries off a small bush. He decided to try them himself, and found they gave him renewed energy and wakefulness. The rest is history.   http://www.thatscoffee.com/scoop/legend-of-the-dancing-goats/


Bullet Proof Coffee:
Bullet proof coffee is a new trend and is currently being sold here in Seattle at most of the downtown cafes. It’s supposed to clear your mind, help you focus and give you energy, without adding a drop of anything sweet. It involves blending unsalted butter and coconut oil with hot coffee (preferably organic). Great for Kid Curry right before a gunfight. It might even make him “bullet proof”!
http://arbiteronline.com/2014/08/20/bulletproof-coffee-the-new-way-to-enjoy-a-cup-of-joe/


Toddy coffee:
Cold (or room temperature) brewed coffee that does not require a heat source. Our ex-outlaws could have prepared the concoction right before climbing into their bedrolls. It would have been ready to drink when they woke in the morning, without lighting a smoky fire and attracting a pesky posse.  It wouldn’t have been hot, but the caffeine content is retained and it would have still woke them up. This coffee has a much reduced acid content and is good for folks with digestive troubles. It tastes mild and smooth, and is wonderful over ice. "Toddy" is a modern term that would not have been used in the 1800's.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cold_brew


Barist-o: 
Baristo isn’t a word, silly.


Barista:
The word barista is an Italian word, and in Italian, a barista is a male or female "bartender", who typically works behind a counter, serving both hot drinks (such as espresso), and cold alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages, not a coffee-maker specifically. Most coffee shops use the title to describe the preparer of coffee and operator of an espresso machine. The native plural in English is baristas, while in Italian the plural is baristi for masculine or mixed sex (baristi: "barmen", "bartenders") or bariste for feminine (bariste: "barmaids").
From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barista


Latte Art: 
True latte art is free poured with little or no manual manipulation of the surface, and consists solely of the contrasting ingredients of dark espresso and light milk. The resulting design is controlled by how you move your wrist while pouring velvety frothed milk into the espresso. If the crema on the coffee or the texture of the foamed milk is not perfect, the designs can not be made. The two most common designs are the free poured “heart” and “rosetta”. There are Latte Art competitions going on all around the country. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=elcwRWdu12Q and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AQ8wIsH3kq4

Why did the US become primarily a coffee drinking nation, rather than tea?:
Before the Boston Tea Party, the American colonists drank just as much tea as coffee, if not more. Due to “taxation without representation” the colonists began to boycott tea. Dressed as Indians, the rebels boarded the merchant ships and threw the tea in Boston Harbor. The inns stopped serving tea as a sign of patriotism and support for independence.  Coffee became the new country’s beverage of choice.


Coffee in America: The 1800’s
Early in the century folks would buy coffee green, roast it themselves on the stovetop, then grind it with a mortar and pestle. Coffee mills were used commercially in inns and stores, but were not commonly found in  homes. It was labor intensive and time consuming to get the “coffee powder” fine enough for what we would call an acceptable cup of coffee today. The green beans had to be gone through carefully to pick out any debris or obvious impurities or bad beans. Roasting the beans was inconsistent, depending on the heat source, and burnt or under roasted beans needed to be picked out before grinding. This went on right up through the Civil War. The only widespread change to the process was that by mid century most homes had acquired a table top hand cranked coffee mill.


“The Coffee That Won the West!”--Arbuckles, 1871
Roasted beans have a short shelf life, so could not be transported long distances for sale or stored long for future use. John Arbuckle changed all this in 1871 when he created a method to keep roasted coffee fresh. Now folks could purchase 1 lb bags of already roasted coffee that would actually keep for awhile. Mr. Arbuckle’s technique was to simply roast the whole coffee beans and then glaze them with a egg and sugar mixture that served to seal the flavor in each bean and extend its shelf life. For the first time roasted coffee beans could be shipped all over the country and still stay fresh. Cowboys could take Arbuckle’s with them on long cattle drives, knowing it wouldn‘t go stale. A hand crank grinder was usually bolted onto the chuck wagon. The cook rarely had to grind the coffee himself because it is said the cowboys would do it in exchange for the peppermint stick that Arbuckle’s included in each pound of coffee. Arbuckle’s coffee was so prominent that folks would ask for an “Arbuckle’s” rather than coffee, much as people will ask for a “Starbucks” (much to my chagrin) today.
http://andreadowning.com/2012/01/03/the-coffee-that-won-the-west/

Cowboy Coffee or “Egg Coffee“:
Back on the trail, cowboys would place the ground coffee and some broken egg shells in a pot with cold water and bring it slowly to a boil. They would remove it from the heat and add a cup of cold water to the brew, causing the grounds to sink to the bottom with the shells. This would also create a less acidic, milder coffee. This technique is said to have come from Scandinavian immigrants that settled in the Midwest, who commonly made “Egg Coffee”. Instead of shells they would crack a raw egg into the grounds, add cold water, and boil. Evidently fish skins were also once used instead of egg.  I found the following link fascinating.
http://blog.khymos.org/2010/08/04/norwegian-egg-coffee/


Percolator:
The first true percolator (as we know it today), is often credited to Illinois' native son and farmer Hanson Goodrich, who took out a patent for the pot in 1889. In his patent application, he describes a contraption that will create "a liquid which will be free of all grounds and impurities. " Less efficient versions of the percolator existed earlier. 


The first canned coffee - Chase & Sanborn Coffee: 
James Sanborn and Caleb Chase produced the first commercially available, ground coffee in sealed cans in 1878. No more labor intensive sorting, roasting and grinding. Not as tasty as freshly roasted and ground, but great for long term storage, shipping, and convenience.  


Espresso machine:
The first espresso machine was built and patented by Angelo Moriondo of Turin, Italy, who demonstrated his design for bulk espresso production at the Turin General Exposition of 1884. However the first espresso machine designed for single servings, such as what we see in cafes today, did not become available until 1905. This is when Desiderio Pavoni of Milan began to manufacture one machine a day for general sale. I imagine America got its first espresso machine shortly thereafter; I am still researching information on the beginnings of espresso in the U.S.

_________________
"If I asked for a cup of coffee, someone would search for the double meaning." Mae West
coffee 


Last edited by Javabee on Thu Sep 04, 2014 12:10 pm; edited 2 times in total
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Stepha3nie

Stepha3nie

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Join date : 2014-07-12
Age : 51
Location : Scotland

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PostSubject: Re: Are You Coffee Curious?   Are You Coffee Curious? EmptyThu Sep 04, 2014 2:32 am

Thank you for posting this. It was very interesting to read (even though I am not a coffee person - sorry) and contained lots of new information for me. Thank you also for the many links. Fascinating.

Might I add a little German coffee making history?
 It is very much connected with a remarkable woman: Melitta Bentz (1873-1950) a housewife from Dresden who invented the drip brew paper coffee filter (patented 1908). She founded the company Melitta, which produced the (mostly) ceramic filters and the filter paper, later other products were added, e.g. coffee pots.
The iconic cone-shaped filter and filter paper were developed during the 1930ies. They were produced in different sizes (from small, for brewing the coffee directly on a cup, to big for huge pots), with different numbers of holes in the bottom of the filter to allow the water to filter/drip through the ground coffee slower or quicker, depending on your preference for stronger or weaker coffee. Size 4 was the standard size for typical households if memory serves correctly.
Growing up most people we knew would still use the traditional German method of making coffee: grind the roasted coffee beans in a hand-cranked coffee grinder (I loved this task as a kid), boil water, put ceramic filter and filter paper on the coffee pot, put in ground coffee, slowly pour in boiling water, wait until enough water has filtered through then top up, until you have the desired amount of coffee in the pot. The advantage of the ceramic filter over lighter weight plastic filters is that its weight prevents it from tipping over easily when adding the water (experience from camping trips). Once coffee machines became popular, the ceramic filter got out of use, but the Melitta filter paper is still widely in use for coffee machines. Today the ceramic filters are collector's items at flea makets/antique markets. My mother and I used to collect them, in different sizes, colours,...

Here is an English language link on Melitta: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Melitta

_________________
"I can resist everything - except temptation"  Oscar Wilde
For me temptation is Hannibal Heyes, especially in chaps!
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RosieAnnieUSA

RosieAnnieUSA

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Join date : 2013-08-24
Age : 100
Location : Chicago, Illinois, USA

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PostSubject: Re: Are You Coffee Curious?   Are You Coffee Curious? EmptyThu Sep 04, 2014 5:16 am

Very interesting! I'm reading this with a cup of coffee at my elbow. Not hand-roasted by me, but by a local purveyor. I've heard of the egg coffee, even used it in a story once. Bullet proof coffee sounds like something I'd like to try. This is the first I've heard of it.

Thanks for the historical information, too. We can use that in a story, too. The boys could enjoy cold coffee, maybe even discover it inadvertently. Or, they can buy some Arbuckle's at a mercantile. Good stuff, Javabee!
 coffee
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PostSubject: Re: Are You Coffee Curious?   Are You Coffee Curious? EmptyThu Sep 04, 2014 7:01 am

Great posting, Javabee. Don't fancy the fish one much!
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riders57

riders57

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PostSubject: Re: Are You Coffee Curious?   Are You Coffee Curious? EmptyThu Sep 04, 2014 7:26 am

Thanks for posting Javabee.  Even though I'm not a coffee drinker it was very interesting information.  I have referred to coffee as Arbuckles in stories before but who knows how much of this will creep into future stories.
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Javabee

Javabee

Posts : 811
Join date : 2013-09-08
Age : 63
Location : Seattle

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PostSubject: Re: Are You Coffee Curious?   Are You Coffee Curious? EmptyThu Sep 04, 2014 12:33 pm

Thanks everyone for your comments, I'm glad you are finding it interesting. 

S3, I am familiar with the Melitta filter papers for the pour over method but did not know of the German origins and history. Thank you for the link. I love seeing antique coffee equipment. I have a small hand crank coffee mill in my home, but no ceramic filters. I will keep my eyes open for one. 

FYI, for today's camp coffee, a modern camper can purchase a camp espresso maker. I have one; it is a small stainless steel pot that sits directly on a grate over the camp fire. Once enough pressure builds from the heat you can even steam milk with the wand that protrudes from its side, but you won't get the same fine, velvety foam that you can get from a commercial machine. I think it's available at REI. 
http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=camp+espresso+maker&qpvt=camp+espresso+maker&FORM=IGRE&id=88AB21DD4FF433DD3425714FC34AECB7E3A71F15&selectedIndex=0#view=detail&id=88AB21DD4FF433DD3425714FC34AECB7E3A71F15&selectedIndex=0

_________________
"If I asked for a cup of coffee, someone would search for the double meaning." Mae West
coffee 
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