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PostSubject: Word of the Day: Ratiocination    Word of the Day - Page 36 EmptyWed Feb 06, 2019 1:46 pm

Word of the Day: Ratiocination 

noun 

Definition

1 : the process of exact thinking : reasoning

2 : a reasoned train of thought

Did You Know?

Edgar Allan Poe is said to have called the 1841 story "The Murders in the Rue Morgue" his first "tale of ratiocination." Many today agree with his assessment and consider that Poe classic to be literature's first detective story. Poe didn't actually use ratiocination in "Rue Morgue," but the term does appear three times in its 1842 sequel, "The Mystery of Marie Roget." In "Marie Roget," the author proved his reasoning ability (ratiocination traces to ratio, Latin for "reason" or "computation"). The second tale was based on an actual murder, and as the case unfolded after the publication of Poe's work, it became clear that his fictional detective had done an amazing job of reasoning through the crime.


Examples

"It is beginning to look like television may soon kill not only the theater and the movies but radio, books, magazines, newspapers, and finally articulate speech and all the processes of ratiocination." — Aldous Huxley, letter, 14 Feb. 1949
"Ratiocination is a trained, disciplined procedure of arriving at truth—a use of reason and perspicacity so precise it's almost supernatural." — Virginia Heffernan, Wired, June 2018
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PostSubject: Word of the Day: Abstruse    Word of the Day - Page 36 EmptyThu Feb 07, 2019 4:06 pm

Word of the Day: Abstruse 

adjective 




Definition

: difficult to comprehend : recondite

Did You Know?

Look closely at the following Latin verbs, all of which are derived from the verb trudere ("to push, thrust"): extrudere, intrudere, obtrudere, protrudere. Remove the last two letters of each of these and you get an English descendant whose meaning involves pushing or thrusting. Another trudere offspring, abstrudere, meaning "to push away" or "to conceal," gave English abstrude, meaning "to thrust away," but that 17th-century borrowing has fallen out of use. An abstrudere descendant that has survived is abstruse, an adjective that recalls the meaning of its Latin parent abstrūsus, meaning "concealed."


Examples

"Today's physics breakthroughs tend to be so abstruse that summarizing them is like trying to explain the financial-derivatives market to a three-year-old." — The National Review, 16 Apr. 2018
"Before the Apple Macintosh, the first computer to popularize point-and-click, people using home computers had to familiarize themselves with abstruse text commands." — Clive Thompson, The New York Times, 18 Nov. 2018
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PostSubject: Word of the Day: Teem    Word of the Day - Page 36 EmptyTue Feb 12, 2019 5:23 am

Word of the Day: Teem  

verb 


Definition

1 : to become filled to overflowing : abound

2 : to be present in large quantity

Did You Know?

The verb teem and the noun team are not just homophones, they are also etymological kin. Teem is derived from Old English tīman or tæman, which originally meant "to bring forth offspring" or "to become pregnant." That word is related to the ancestor of team, the Old English noun tēam, meaning "offspring, lineage, or group of draft animals." Team can still be used to refer to a brood of young animals, especially pigs or ducks, but both teem and team have otherwise largely left their offspring-related senses behind.


Examples

"On Friday, Tselikis stood in front of the Red's Best stall at Boston's Public Market, offering up tidbits about lobsters as they teemed inside a tank." — Gintautas Dumcius, MassLive.com, 10 June 2016
"But beneath the surface, some of the rigs are teeming with biological life. Dozens of fish species, thousands of different kinds of invertebrates, and sea lions all call the rigs home." — Erik Olsen, Quartz, 17 Nov. 2018
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PostSubject: Word of the Day: Prescind    Word of the Day - Page 36 EmptyTue Feb 12, 2019 5:26 pm

Word of the Day: Prescind  

verb 


Definition

1 : to withdraw one's attention

2 : to detach for purposes of thought

Did You Know?

Prescind derives from the Latin verb praescindere, which means "to cut off in front." Praescindere, in turn, was formed by combining prae- ("before") and scindere ("to cut" or "to split"). So it should come as no surprise that when prescind was first used during the 17th century, it referred to "cutting off" one's attention from a subject. An earlier (now archaic) sense was even clearer about the etymological origins of the word, with the meaning "to cut short, off, or away" or "to sever." Other descendants of scindere include rescind ("to take back or make void") and the rare scissile ("capable of being cut").


Examples

"But to frame an abstract idea of happiness, prescinded from all particular pleasure, or of goodness, from everything that is good, this is what few can pretend to." — George Berkeley, A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge, 1710
"Nooyi prescinded from the share price-obsessed practices associated with most conglomerates—and instead said she was focused on making PepsiCo the kind of company that would deliver a 'lasting impact' to society." — Edmund Heaphy, Quartz, 6 Aug. 2018
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PostSubject: Word of the Day: Cacophony    Word of the Day - Page 36 EmptyWed Feb 13, 2019 3:28 pm

Word of the Day: Cacophony  

noun 

Definition

1 : harsh or discordant sound : dissonance; specifically : harshness in the sound of words or phrases

2 : an incongruous or chaotic mixture : a striking combination

Did You Know?

Words that descend from the Greek word phone are making noise in English. Why? Because phone means "sound" or "voice." Cacophony comes from a joining of the Greek prefix kak- (from kakos,meaning "bad") with phone, so it essentially means "bad sound." Symphony, a word that indicates harmony or agreement in sound, traces to phone and the Greek prefix syn-, which means "together." Polyphony refers to a style of musical composition in which two or more independent melodies are juxtaposed in harmony, and it comes from a combination of phone and the Greek prefix poly-, meaning "many." And euphony, a word for a pleasing or sweet sound, combines phone with eu-, a prefix that means "good."

Examples

"But never in their most uneasy dreams did they expect the cacophony—a word which here means 'the sound of two metal pots being banged together by a nasty foreman standing in the doorway holding no breakfast at all'—that awoke them." — Lemony Snicket, The Miserable Mill, 2000
"Divided into groups of ten or so, the students came forward for an opportunity to play the instruments. The cacophony that resulted was matched only by the children's broad smiles as they blew tubas, banged on drums or drew bows across violins." — Steven Felschundneff, The Claremont (California) Courier, 29 Nov. 2018
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PostSubject: Word of the Day: Heartstring    Word of the Day - Page 36 EmptyThu Feb 14, 2019 4:28 pm

Word of the Day: Heartstring 

noun 

Definition

: the deepest emotions or affections — usually used in plural

Did You Know?

Before a song or movie or heart-shaped card accompanied by a box of chocolates could tug at your heartstrings, the job was more likely to be accomplished by a surgeon: the word heartstring used to refer to a nerve believed to sustain the heart. You might recognize the word's second syllable in the term hamstring, which refers to both a group of tendons at the back of the knee and to any of three muscles at the backs of the upper legs. It's also apparent in a rare dialect term for the Achilles' tendon: heel string. And in light of these terms, it's not surprising to know that string itself was at one time used independently to refer to cords like tendons and ligaments.

Examples

"While on Facebook, have you ever come across a posting that tugs at your heartstrings? Photos of adorable abandoned puppies, say, or a story about a cute little girl who didn't get any happy birthday wishes? You instinctively click the 'thumbs-up' or add a comment (Happy birthday!) and maybe even decide to share the posting." — Mary C. Hickey, Consumer Reports, June 2018
"There are two moments in 'Mary Poppins Returns' when the grown-ups watching really lose it: Dick Van Dyke's arrival and when Angela Lansbury starts singing. Those are playing on a lifetime of heartstrings." — Lin-Manuel Miranda, quoted in USA Today, 27 Dec. 2018
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PostSubject: Word of the Day: Disavow    Word of the Day - Page 36 EmptySun Feb 17, 2019 4:41 pm

Word of the Day: Disavow  

verb 


Definition

1 : to deny responsibility for : repudiate

2 : to refuse to acknowledge or accept : disclaim

Did You Know?

If you trace the etymology of disavow back through Middle English to Anglo-French, you'll arrive eventually at the prefix des- and the verb avouer, meaning "to avow." The prefix des-, in turn, derives from the Latin prefix dis-, meaning "apart." That Latin prefix plays a significant role in many current English words, including disadvantage, disappoint, and disagree. Avouer is from Latin advocare, meaning "to summon," and is also the source of our word advocate.


Examples

It seems the college's president is now trying to disavow her previous statements.
"Last week in Beijing, ['Crazy Rich Asians'] director Jon M. Chu essentially disavowed every word in the film's title. 'The film is a satire,' Chu told the state-affiliated Global Times. 'It's not about "crazy rich" or "Asians" actually—it's about the opposite of that. It's about how all those things mean nothing and it comes down to our own relationships and finding love and our own families.'" — Rebecca Davis, Variety, 29 Nov. 2018
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PostSubject: Word of the Day: Prestigious    Word of the Day - Page 36 EmptyMon Feb 18, 2019 2:47 pm

Word of the Day: Prestigious  

adjective 


Definition

1 archaic : of, relating to, or marked by illusion, conjuring, or trickery

2 : having an illustrious name or reputation : esteemed in general opinion

Did You Know?

You may be surprised to learn that prestigious had more to do with trickery than with respect when it was first used in the mid-16th century. The earliest (now archaic) meaning of the word was "of, relating to, or marked by illusion, conjuring, or trickery." Prestigious comes to us from the Latin word praestigiosis, meaning "full of tricks" or "deceitful." The words prestige and prestigious are related, of course, though not as directly as you might think; they share a Latin ancestor, but they entered English by different routes. Prestige, which was borrowed from French in the mid-17th century, initially meant "a conjurer's trick," but in the 19th century it developed an extended sense of "blinding or dazzling influence." That change, in turn, influenced prestigious, which now means simply "illustrious or esteemed."

Examples

Carla was overjoyed to receive an acceptance letter from the prestigious university.
"The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art has announced 16 finalists for its closely watched SECA [Society for the Encouragement of Contemporary Art] Art Award for 2019. The awards are the region's most prestigious recognition for emerging artists." — Charles Desmarais, The San Francisco Chronicle, 14 Dec. 2018
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PostSubject: Word of the Day: Emote    Word of the Day - Page 36 EmptyTue Feb 19, 2019 2:09 pm

Word of the Day: Emote 

verb 


Definition

: to give expression to emotion especially in acting

Did You Know?

Emote is an example of what linguists call a back-formation—that is, a word formed by trimming down an existing word (in this case, emotion). As is sometimes the case with back-formations, emote has since its coinage in the early 20th century tended toward use that is less than entirely serious. It frequently appears in humorous or deprecating descriptions of the work of actors, and is similarly used to describe theatrical behavior by nonactors. Though a writer sometimes wants us to take someone's "emoting" seriously, a phrase like "expressing emotion" avoids the chance that we will hear some snideness in the writer's words.


Examples

"It's not always immediately obvious, but sometimes you fall in love with a band for the way the singers emote." — James Reed, The Boston Globe, 24 Jan. 2012
"Aiming for a higher quality than masks allowed, the makeup artist John Chambers developed a new type of foam rubber and created facial appliances that allowed actors to talk and emote." — Andrew R. Chow, The New York Times, 31 Dec. 2018
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PostSubject: Word of the Day: Obsequious    Word of the Day - Page 36 EmptyWed Feb 20, 2019 4:00 pm

Word of the Day: Obsequious 

adjective 

Definition

: marked by or exhibiting a fawning attentiveness

Did You Know?

An obsequious person is more likely to be a follower than a leader. Use that fact to help you remember the meaning of obsequious. All you need to do is bear in mind that the word comes from the Latin root sequi, meaning "to follow." (The other contributor is the prefix ob-, meaning "toward.") Sequi is the source of a number of other English words, too, including consequence (a result that follows from an action), sequel (a novel, film, or TV show that follows and continues a story begun in another), and non sequitur (a conclusion that doesn't follow from what was said before).

Examples

"Not pleasing others enough amounts to surliness, pleasing too much makes one obsequious—you have to be friendly, but not too friendly. The sweet spot in the middle is where you want to be." — Carlin Flora, Psychology Today, 1 July 2017
"She read up on professors beforehand and, if their written work was accessible, familiarized herself with it, so she could make mention of it. That flattered them and pegged her as a serious, considerate person. Taking that too far, of course, could be repulsively obsequious." — Frank Bruni, The New York Times, 19 Aug. 2018
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PostSubject: Word of the Day: Hoopla    Word of the Day - Page 36 EmptyThu Feb 21, 2019 4:02 pm

Word of the Day: Hoopla 


noun 


Definition

1 : excited commotion : to-do

2 : exaggerated or sensational promotion or publicity : ballyhoo

Did You Know?

In French, the interjection houp-là is used roughly the same way as English's upsy-daisy or whoops-a-daisy, as one might say when picking up a child. (This usage can be found in English, too, in such works as Booth Tarkington's The Magnificent Ambersons and James Joyce's Ulysses.) When the word was borrowed into American English, however, it was to refer to a kind of bustling commotion, and later, as a term for sensationalist hype. In the early 20th century, another hoopla was in use as well. Playing on the syllable hoop, that word gave its name to a ring-toss game played at carnivals.


Examples

"Ideas change as data accumulate. If future evidence causes me to change my mind again, that's okay. That's how the scientific method works, always revising what we thought we knew, eventually casting aside the emotional hoopla, and ultimately granting us not a measure of truth so much as a better approximation of reality." — Eric J. Chaisson, The Atlantic, 16 Oct. 2018
"My wife and I were watching all this [government] shutdown hoopla on television. My wife then said, 'Why don't you serve them meals?' So we decided to extend it out to all of the Coast Guard members stationed here…." — James Gubata, quoted in The Providence Journal, 15 Jan. 2019
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PostSubject: Word of the Day: Impetus    Word of the Day - Page 36 EmptyMon Feb 25, 2019 4:30 am

Word of the Day: Impetus  

noun 




Definition

1 a : a driving force : impulse

b : incentive, stimulus

c : stimulation or encouragement resulting in increased activity

2 : the property possessed by a moving body in virtue of its mass and its motion — used of bodies moving suddenly or violently to indicate the origin and intensity of the motion

Did You Know?

You already have plenty of incentive to learn the origin of impetus, so we won't force the point. Impetus comes from Latin, where it means "attack or assault"; the verb impetere was formed by combining the prefix in- with petere, meaning "to go to or seek." Petere also gives us other words suggesting a forceful urging or momentum, such as appetite, perpetual, and centripetal. Impetus describes the kind of force that encourages an action ("the impetus behind the project") or the momentum of an action already begun ("the meetings only gave impetus to the rumors of a merger").


Examples

The high salary and generous benefits package were impetus enough to apply for the job.
"Several legislators who spoke at last week's workshop cited a recent series by the Post & Courier of Charleston as the impetus for this year's focus on education." — Kirk Brown, The Greenville (South Carolina) News, 9 Jan. 2019
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PostSubject: Word of the Day: Sequester    Word of the Day - Page 36 EmptyMon Feb 25, 2019 5:55 pm

Word of the Day: Sequester  

verb 



Definition

1 : to set apart : segregate

2 : to seize by authority of a writ

Did You Know?

Sequester first appeared in English in the 14th century. The word derives from Latin sequestrare ("to hand over to a trustee") and ultimately from secus ("beside," "otherwise"), which is akin to Latin sequi ("to follow"). In this relationship, we can trace links to words such as sequel, sequence, consequence, and subsequent, all of which convey a meaning of one thing following another. These days, we most frequently hear sequester used in legal contexts, as juries are sometimes sequestered for the safety of their members or to prevent the influence of outside sources on a verdict. In a different sense, it is possible to sequester property in certain legal situations.


Examples

The reality series will feature ten celebrity contestants who will be sequestered in a haunted mansion for twelve weeks.
"Typically, a judge makes the decision to sequester a jury, often when there is risk that outside interference could affect a juror's ability to be fair and impartial or when there are heightened security concerns." — Lydia Wheeler and Morgan Chalfant, The Hill, 20 Aug. 2018
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PostSubject: Word of the Day: Avuncular    Word of the Day - Page 36 EmptyTue Feb 26, 2019 3:14 pm

Word of the Day: Avuncular 

adjective 


Definition

1 : suggestive of an uncle especially in kindliness or geniality

2 : of or relating to an uncle

Did You Know?

Not all uncles are likeable fellows (Hamlet's murderous Uncle Claudius, for example, isn't exactly Mr. Nice Guy in William Shakespeare's tragedy), but avuncular reveals that, as a group, uncles are generally seen as affable and benevolent, if at times a bit patronizing. Avuncular derives from the Latin noun avunculus, which translates as "maternal uncle," but since at least the 19th century English speakers have used avuncular to refer to uncles from either side of the family or even to individuals who are simply uncle-like in character or behavior. And in case you were wondering, avunculus is also an ancestor of the word uncle itself.

Examples

At 18 years her senior, May's brother was a steadying force in her life, supportive and avuncular.
"Today's generation of fans knew [Stan] Lee as the avuncular elder statesman who regaled packed halls at comic conventions with stories of his years in the medium, and for his cameos in every Marvel movie, which he continued well into his 90s." — Rob Salkowitz, Forbes, 12 Nov. 2018
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PostSubject: Word of the Day: Grift    Word of the Day - Page 36 EmptyWed Feb 27, 2019 1:12 pm

Word of the Day: Grift 

verb 


Definition

1 : to obtain (money) illicitly (as in a confidence game)

2 : to acquire money or property illicitly

Did You Know?

Grift was born in the argot of the underworld, a realm in which a "grifter" might be a pickpocket, a crooked gambler, or a confidence man—any criminal who relied on skill and wits rather than physical violence—and to be "on the grift" was to make a living by stings and clever thefts. Grift may have evolved from graft, a slightly older word meaning "to acquire dishonestly," but its exact origins are uncertain. We do know that the verb grift first finagled its way into print in the early 20th century, as demonstrated in George Bronson-Howard's 1915 novel God's Man, where it appears in gerund form: "Grifting ain't what it used to be. Fourteenth Street's got protection down to a system—a regular underworld tariff on larceny."


Examples

The guidebook warns that the city's con artists grift millions of dollars from unwary tourists annually.
"He's somebody that lived and grifted, lived for the day. As soon as he got any money from some shady deal or whatever he was involved in, he just spent it." — Richard E. Grant, quoted on Vox.com, 18 Oct. 2018
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PostSubject: Word of the Day: Chockablock    Word of the Day - Page 36 EmptyThu Feb 28, 2019 3:25 pm

Word of the Day: Chockablock  

adjective 


Definition

1 : brought close together

2 : very full

Did You Know?

Chockablock started out as a nautical term. A block is a metal or wooden case with one or more pulleys inside. Sometimes, two or more blocks are used as part of a rope and pulley system called a "block and tackle" to provide a mechanical advantage—as, for example, when hoisting a sail on a traditional sailing ship. When the rope is pulled as far as it will go, the blocks are tight together and are said to be chockablock. Non-nautical types associated the chock in chockablock with chock-full, which goes back to Middle English chokkefull, meaning "full to the limit" (a figurative use of "full to choking"). We thus gave chockablock the additional meaning "filled up." Chockablock can also be an adverb meaning "as close or as completely as possible," as in "families living chockablock" or the seemingly redundant "chockablock full."


Examples

"The one-square-mile borough is chockablock with shops, restaurants, small businesses, and a bustling downtown." — Katie Park, The Philadelphia Inquirer, 13 Jan. 2019
"The release schedule for the next few months of music is chockablock with new voices, classic names, and bands in the process of transitioning from the first category to the second." — Spencer Kornhaber, The Atlantic, 5 Sept. 201
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PostSubject: Word of the Day: Feisty    Word of the Day - Page 36 EmptyMon Mar 04, 2019 5:11 am

Word of the Day: Feisty 

adjective 


Definition

1 chiefly Southern US and Midland US

a : full of nervous energy : fidgety  

b : touchy, quarrelsome  

c : exuberantly frisky

2 : having or showing a lively aggressiveness : spunky

Did You Know?

In certain parts of the United States, most notably the South, the noun feist (pronounced to rhyme with heist) refers to a small dog used in hunting small game animals (such as squirrels). Also spelled fice or fyce, it comes from an obsolete term, "fisting hound," that derived from another obsolete term, fist, a verb that once meant "to break wind." The term feisty has come a long way from its flatulent origin, but its small-dog association still seems relevant: the term conveys the spunk and determination that one may associate with a dog that manages to make its presence known (either through its bark or its bite) despite its small size.


Examples

"She's feisty. She's bawdy. She's bodacious.... She's a bit of a wild child." — Vicki Lawrence, quoted in The New York Magazine, 5 Oct. 2018
"The rise of satellite and cable technology in the nineties created new possibilities for nationally syndicated programs built around feisty, voice-driven pundits." — Hua Hsu, The New Yorker, 24 Sept. 2018
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PostSubject: Word of the Day: Gormless   Word of the Day - Page 36 EmptyMon Mar 04, 2019 4:20 pm

Word of the Day: Gormless 

adjective 



Definition

chiefly British : lacking intelligence : stupid

Did You Know?

Gormless began life as the English dialect word gaumless, which was altered to the modern spelling when it expanded into wider use in the late 19th century. The origins of gaumless are easy to understand; the word derives from a combination of the dialect noun gaum, meaning "attention" or "understanding," and the suffix -less. This gaum has a related verb, also limited to dialect use, meaning "to pay attention to" and "to understand." Perhaps surprisingly, the four-letter gaum has multiple additional dialectal uses that are etymologically unrelated to these. Also noun-and-verb pairs, gaum means "a sticky or greasy mess" and "to smudge or smear especially with something sticky or greasy," as well as "a stupid doltish person" and "to behave in a stupid or awkward manner." Use of all of these pales in comparison to that of gormless, however, which is most frequently seen in British English.


Examples

"It would be difficult to think of many things more gormless than driving a car while blindfolded…." — Fergus Kelly, The Express, 16 Jan. 2019
"On screen, Laurel played gormless underling to Hardy's finicky little king. Off screen, though, the roles were reversed. Laurel co-directed the pictures and devised the bulk of the gags." — Xan Brooks, The Guardian, 4 Jan. 2019
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PostSubject: Word of the Day: Leviathan    Word of the Day - Page 36 EmptyTue Mar 05, 2019 1:36 pm

Word of the Day: Leviathan 

noun 


Definition

1 a often capitalized Leviathan : a sea monster defeated by Yahweh in various scriptural accounts

b : a large sea animal

2 capitalized Leviathan : the political state; especially : a totalitarian state having a vast bureaucracy

3 : something large or formidable

Did You Know?

Old Testament references to a huge sea monster, Leviathan (in Hebrew, Liwyāthān), are thought to spring from an ancient myth in which the god Baal slays a multiheaded sea monster. Leviathan appears in the book of Psalms as a sea serpent that is killed by God and then given as food to creatures in the wilderness, and it is referred to in the book of Job as well. We began equating Leviathan with the political state after the philosopher Thomas Hobbes used the word in (and as the title of) his 1651 political treatise on government. Today, Leviathan often suggests a crushing political bureaucracy. Leviathan can also be immensely useful as a general term meaning "something monstrous or of enormous size."


Examples

"Fossils of the ancient leviathan were unearthed from 480-million-year-old rocks exposed on a hillside in southeastern Morocco." — Sid Perkins, Science, 11 Mar. 2015
"… [T]he extension of the Star Wars story has been the biggest global movie phenomenon since Avatar…. It is a leviathan, totaling nearly $4.5 billion in global ticket sales and an entire subcultural media industry." — Sean Fennessey, The Ringer, 25 May 2018
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PostSubject: Word of the Day: Abecedarian    Word of the Day - Page 36 EmptyWed Mar 06, 2019 2:36 pm

Word of the Day: Abecedarian  

adjective 



Definition

1 a : of or relating to the alphabet

b : alphabetically arranged

2 : rudimentary

Did You Know?

The history of abecedarian is as simple as ABC—literally. The term's Late Latin ancestor, abecedārius (which meant "alphabetical"), was created as a combination of the letters A, B, C, and D, plus the adjective suffix -arius; you can hear the echo of that origin in the pronunciation of the English term (think "ABC-darian"). In its oldest documented English uses in the early 1600s, abecedarian was a noun meaning "one learning the rudiments of something"; it specifically referred to someone who was learning the alphabet. The adjective began appearing in English texts a few decades after the noun.


Examples

The children recited an abecedarian chant, beginning with "A is for apple" and ending with "Z is for zebra."
"Aficionados of Sue Grafton's popular detective novels starring Kinsey Millhone will not be disappointed by S is for Silence, Grafton's 19th book in her abecedarian series launched in 1982 with A is for Alibi." — Jan Collins, The State (Columbia, South Carolina), 11 Dec. 2005
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PostSubject: Word of the Day: Mirandize   Word of the Day - Page 36 EmptyThu Mar 07, 2019 4:26 pm

Word of the Day: Mirandize 

verb 



Definition

: to recite the Miranda warnings to (a person under arrest)

Did You Know?

"You have the right to remain silent...." These seven words typically begin the notification that police recite to inform a suspect of his or her rights while in custody. The law requiring this recitation stemmed from a 1966 U.S. Supreme Court decision (Miranda v. Arizona) in which the court overturned the conviction of Ernesto A. Miranda on charges of rape and kidnapping. The court had determined that Miranda confessed to the crime without being informed that he could remain silent during questioning. The list of rights that must be recited to a suspect in custody subsequently became known as "the Miranda warnings." And by the 1970s, people began using the verb Mirandize in reference to such a recitation.

Examples

"Miranda warnings only kick in if you're going to interrogate a suspect. And so if they didn't Mirandize him, and they didn't ask him any questions, that wouldn't be a problem at all. The remedy for failing to Mirandize someone is that their statements to the officers then become inadmissible at trial. — Barbara McQuade, quoted on MSNBC, 1 Feb. 2019
"According to the website, Heller's motion is baseless as there was no need for police to Mirandize the actress since she wasn't in their custody, and it's 'perfectly legal to question people involved in a car accident without reading them their rights.'" — The Huffington Post, 26 Feb. 2013
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PostSubject: Word of the Day: Shard    Word of the Day - Page 36 EmptySun Mar 10, 2019 6:33 pm

Word of the Day: Shard  

noun 


Definition

1 a : a piece or fragment of a brittle substance; broadly : a small piece or part : scrap

b : shell, scale; especially : elytron

2 : a fragment of a pottery vessel found on sites and in refuse deposits where pottery-making peoples have lived

3 : highly angular curved glass fragments of tuffaceous sediment

Did You Know?

Shard dates back to Old English (where it was spelled sceard), and it is related to the Old English word scieran, meaning "to cut." English speakers have adopted the modernized shard spelling for most uses, but archeologists prefer to spell the word sherd when referring to the ancient fragments of pottery they unearth. Other specialized uses of the word shard include a sense referring to the thick front wings in beetles that protect a hind pair of wings and another sense used for the highly angular curved glass fragments of a type of volcanic rock formation.


Examples

There were shards of glass on the floor where the burglars had broken into the building the night before.
"Some 2,600 years ago, in the land of ancient Israel, a military official inked a request onto the reverse side of a pottery shard: 'If there is any wine, send [quantity].' Archaeologists found the shard in the 1960s, but the boozy inscription, which had faded to near invisibility, went unnoticed for decades." — Brigit Katz, Smithsonian, 22 June 2017
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PostSubject: Word of the Day: Bathetic    Word of the Day - Page 36 EmptyMon Mar 11, 2019 3:48 pm

Word of the Day: Bathetic  

adjective 



Definition

: characterized by triteness or sentimentalism

Did You Know?

When English speakers turned apathy into apathetic in the late 17th century, using the suffix -etic to turn the noun into the adjective, they were inspired by pathetic, the adjectival form of pathos, from Greek pathētikos. People also applied that bit of linguistic transformation to coin bathetic. English speakers added the suffix -etic to bathos, the Greek word for "depth," which in English has come to mean "triteness" or "excessive sentimentalism." The result: the ideal adjective for the incredibly commonplace or the overly sentimental.


Examples

"The TV people inevitably reduce history to a series of bathetic tropes: the flag waving in slow motion, the rescued puppy, the evacuee given the star treatment of American Idol." — Matthew Power, Harper's, December 2005
"A vein of knowingness runs through it, a gently comic self-portrait of a lost soul out of time, as when Pierce casts himself in the bathetic role of a 'lonely rock and roller' hankering to hear Big Star on the radio." — Ludovic Hunter-Tilney, The Financial Times, 7 Sept. 2018
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PostSubject: Word of the Day: Minion   Word of the Day - Page 36 EmptyTue Mar 12, 2019 6:51 pm

Word of the Day: Minion 

noun 

718 797 1392

Definition

1 : a servile dependent, follower, or underling

2 : one highly favored : idol

3 : a subordinate or petty official

Did You Know?

Minion comes to us from Middle French and has a somewhat surprising cousin in English: filet mignon. The two words are connected by way of Middle French mignon, meaning "darling." Minion entered English around 1500 directly from Middle French, whereas filet mignon arrived significantly later by way of a modern French phrase meaning "dainty fillet." The earliest uses of minion referred to someone who was a particular favorite, or darling, of a sovereign or other important personage. Over time, however, the word developed a more derogatory sense referring to a person who is servile and unimportant.


Examples

The senior executive has a small platoon of minions to run both personal and business errands for him.
"Smartphones make it easier for managers to change their minds at the last moment: for example, to e-mail a minion at 11pm to tell him he must fly to Pittsburgh tomorrow." — The Economist, 10 Mar. 2012
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PostSubject: Word of the Day: Zero-sum    Word of the Day - Page 36 EmptyWed Mar 13, 2019 3:16 pm

Word of the Day: Zero-sum  

adjective 


Definition

: of, relating to, or being a situation (such as a game or relationship) in which a gain for one side entails a corresponding loss for the other side

Did You Know?

Does game theory sound like fun? It can be—if you are a mathematician or economist who needs to analyze a competitive situation in which the outcome is determined by the choices of the players and chance. Game theory was introduced by mathematician John von Neumann and economist Oskar Morgenstern in their 1944 book The Theory of Games and Economic Behavior. In game theory, a zero-sum game is one, such as chess or checkers, where each player has a clear purpose that is completely opposed to that of the opponent. In economics, a situation is zero-sum if the gains of one party are exactly balanced by the losses of another and no net gain or loss is created. (Such situations are rare.)


Examples

"Among the greatest risks posed by a new recession is that governments may engage in a zero-sum war for spending. Unable to overcome the technical and political hurdles to creating more money at home, they might opt to suck in money from abroad." — The Economist, 13 Oct. 2018
"The industry conflict is too often framed as physical retail versus online retail. Statistical analyses of the growth of e-commerce almost always get coupled with a story surrounding the decline of physical retail, with a heavy focus on the closure of malls. These two things are undoubtedly linked, but experts often communicate this as a zero-sum game. This ignores a fundamental human truth: People now and into the future will continue to leave the house and shop in physical retail." — Warwick Heathwood, Adweek, 18 Apr. 2018Word of the Day: Zero-sum  

adjective 


Definition

: of, relating to, or being a situation (such as a game or relationship) in which a gain for one side entails a corresponding loss for the other side

Did You Know?

Does game theory sound like fun? It can be—if you are a mathematician or economist who needs to analyze a competitive situation in which the outcome is determined by the choices of the players and chance. Game theory was introduced by mathematician John von Neumann and economist Oskar Morgenstern in their 1944 book The Theory of Games and Economic Behavior. In game theory, a zero-sum game is one, such as chess or checkers, where each player has a clear purpose that is completely opposed to that of the opponent. In economics, a situation is zero-sum if the gains of one party are exactly balanced by the losses of another and no net gain or loss is created. (Such situations are rare.)


Examples

"Among the greatest risks posed by a new recession is that governments may engage in a zero-sum war for spending. Unable to overcome the technical and political hurdles to creating more money at home, they might opt to suck in money from abroad." — The Economist, 13 Oct. 2018
"The industry conflict is too often framed as physical retail versus online retail. Statistical analyses of the growth of e-commerce almost always get coupled with a story surrounding the decline of physical retail, with a heavy focus on the closure of malls. These two things are undoubtedly linked, but experts often communicate this as a zero-sum game. This ignores a fundamental human truth: People now and into the future will continue to leave the house and shop in physical retail." — Warwick Heathwood, Adweek, 18 Apr. 2018
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