Alias Smith and Jones Fun and Fanfiction
Alias Smith and Jones Fun and Fanfiction

A site for all kinds of fun for fans of Alias Smith and Jones
 
HomeHome  PortalPortal  CalendarCalendar  UsergroupsUsergroups  RegisterRegister  Log in  

Share | 
 

 Word of the Day

Go down 
Go to page : Previous  1 ... 16 ... 28, 29, 30  Next
AuthorMessage
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 7854
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Aggress   Sat May 19, 2018 11:35 pm

Word of the Day: Aggress 

verb 




Definition

: to make an attack : to act aggressively

Did You Know?

Aggress and its more familiar relatives aggression and aggressive derive from the Latin verb aggredi, meaning "to approach, attack, or undertake." Although the modern word aggress carries only the second of these three meanings, the word could when it was first used in English in the 16th century also mean "to approach." That use is now obsolete. There also exists a noun aggress, which is too rare to qualify for entry in even our unabridged dictionary.  It typically means "an attack," but also has an obsolete meaning of "an approach."



Examples

Certain indicators, such as irritability, can signify an animal's likelihood to aggress.
"Under-socialized dogs are risks to their owners and to others because they can become frightened by everyday things, making them more likely to aggress or bite." — Dottie Nelson, The Addison County (Vermont) Independent, 17 July 2017
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 7854
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Besot    Sun May 20, 2018 8:07 pm

Word of the Day: Besot  

verb




Definition

1 : infatuate

2 : to make dull or stupid; especially : to muddle with drunkenness

Did You Know?

Besot developed from a combination of the prefix be- ("to cause to be") and sot, a now-archaic verb meaning "to cause to appear foolish or stupid." Sot in turn comes from the Middle English noun sott, meaning "fool." Early print evidence of besot is found in a poem by George Turberville, published in 1567. In the poem, the narrator describes how he gazed at a beautiful stranger "till use of sense was fled." He then proceeds to compare himself to Aegisthus of Greek legend, the lover of Clytemnestra while Agamemnon was away at war, writing: "What forced the Fool to love / his beastly idle life / Was cause that he besotted was / of Agamemnon's Wife."



Examples

"Anyone spending time watching Australian TV … must conclude that food and the cooking thereof besots our nation." — Garry Barker, The Age (Melbourne, Australia), 26 June 2014
"They debauch the spirit of the ignorant and credulous with mystical trash, as effectually as if they had besotted their brains with gin, and then pick their pockets with the same facility." — Sir Walter Scott, The Antiquary, 1816
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 7854
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Unfettered   Mon May 21, 2018 6:42 pm

Word of the Day: Unfettered  

adjective 




Definition

: free, unrestrained

Did You Know?

A fetter is a chain or shackle for the feet (as used on a prisoner), or, more broadly, anything that confines or restrains. The word derives from Middle English feter and shares an ancestor with Old English fot, meaning "foot." Fetter and unfetter both function as verbs in English with contrasting literal meanings having to do with the putting on of and freeing from fetters; they likewise have contrasting figurative extensions having to do with the depriving and granting of freedom. The adjective unfettered resides mostly in the figurative, with the word typically describing someone or something unrestrained in progress or spirit. This is how English poet and clergyman John Donne used the word in his early 17th-century work The Progress of the Soule: "To an unfetterd soules quick nimble hast / Are falling stars, and hearts thoughts, but slow pac'd."


Examples

The biographer has been given unfettered access to the family's collection of personal correspondence.
"We are both deeply committed to facilitating the restoration and preservation of open and unfettered political dialogue." — Howard Dean and Newt Gingrich, The Chicago Daily Herald, 17 Apr. 2018
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 7854
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Garrulous    Tue May 22, 2018 9:43 pm

Word of the Day: Garrulous 

adjective 




Definition

1 : given to prosy, rambling, or tedious loquacity : pointlessly or annoyingly talkative

2 : using or containing many and usually too many words : wordy

Did You Know?

English has many adjectives that share the meaning "given to talk" or "talking." Talkative may imply a readiness to talk or a disposition to enjoy conversation, while loquacious suggests the power of expressing oneself articulately, fluently, or glibly. Voluble suggests a free, easy, and unending talkativeness, and garrulous implies talkativeness that is dull, rambling, or tedious. Garrulous, by the way, derives from the Latin verb garrire, which means "to chatter" or "to talk rapidly."


Examples

Bob's garrulous and outgoing nature is a stark contrast to his brother's more retiring demeanor.
"Travel impresses on the memory a kaleidoscope of disparate images…. Men in long gray shirts and trousers play cards. In a dusty, narrow street, an old woman sells vegetables. Garrulous gray and black crows look for food along the sewage canal." — Krista Kafer, The Denver Post, 1 Dec. 2017
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 7854
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Petard    Wed May 23, 2018 6:37 pm

Word of the Day: Petard  

noun 




Definition

1 : a case containing an explosive to break down a door or gate or breach a wall

2 : a firework that explodes with a loud report

Did You Know?

Aside from historical references to siege warfare, and occasional contemporary references to fireworks, petard is almost always encountered in variations of the phrase "hoist with one's own petard," meaning "victimized or hurt by one's own scheme." The phrase comes from William Shakespeare's Hamlet: "For 'tis the sport to have the enginer / Hoist with his own petar." Hoist in this case is the past participle of the verb hoise, meaning "to lift or raise," and petar(d) refers to an explosive device used in siege warfare. Hamlet uses the example of the engineer (the person who sets the explosive device) being blown into the air by his own device as a metaphor for those who schemed against him being undone by their own schemes. The phrase has endured, even if its literal meaning has largely been forgotten.


Examples

"The metal walls of the narrow corridor would scatter ricochets and shrapnel in every direction, and any intact panels of reflex armor would ignite grenades and petards in counterfire…." — John C. Wright, The Judge of Ages, 2014
"I ran back and seized a tin box which had been filled with candles. It was about the size of my busby—large enough to hold several pounds of powder. Duroc filled it while I cut off the end of a candle. When we had finished, it would have puzzled a colonel of engineers to make a better petard." — Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The Exploits of Brigadier Gerard, 1896
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 7854
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the: Winsome    Thu May 24, 2018 8:54 pm

Word of the: Winsome  

adjective 




Definition
1 : generally pleasing and engaging often because of a childlike charm and innocence 

2 : cheerful, lighthearted

Did You Know?

Winsome began as wynsum many centuries ago. It was formed from wynn, the Old English word for "joy" or "pleasure," and the suffix -sum, an older form of the -some we see today in many adjectives, such as awesome, irksome, and lonesome. Wynn later became win, meaning "pleasure," but that noun is now obsolete. We do, however, use another word that has a "pleasing" connection and is related, albeit distantly, to winsome. Winning ("tending to please or delight," as in "a winning smile" or "winning ways"), the present participle of the familiar verb win, is from Old English winnan, meaning "to struggle." Both winnan and wynn are thought to be related to Latin venus, which means, among other things, "charm."




Examples

"… the song's giddy piano licks and bass groove are so winsome and familiar, the whole thing's tough to place in any particular setting. Simply put, it's a pop song, in a very classic sense." — Chris Payne, Billboard, 17 May 2017
"The winsome Canadian comedy 'Don't Talk to Irene' combines a high school misfit movie with a backstage musical and adds a few fantastical flourishes for an uplifting tale about an outsider finding her place in the world. It's so sweet it just might give you a cavity." — Katie Walsh, The Los Angeles Times, 1 Mar. 2018
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 7854
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Homogeneous    Fri May 25, 2018 7:00 pm

Word of the Day: Homogeneous 

adjective 


Definition

1 : of the same or a similar kind or nature

2 : of uniform structure or composition throughout

Did You Know?

Homogeneous, which derives from the Greek roots homos, meaning "same," and genos, meaning "kind," has been used in English since the early 1600s. The similar word homogenous (originally created for the science of genetics and used with the meaning "of, relating to, or derived from another individual of the same species") can also be a synonym of homogeneous. The words need not be used exclusively in scientific contexts—one can speak of, for example, "a homogenous/homogeneous community."
  


Examples

Stir in the flour, water, eggs, and sugar until it all blends together into one homogeneous mixture.
"The new makeovers also are being tailored to a store's community. That's a shift from the former homogeneous approach that stocked the company's 175 stores with the same inventory." — Shandra Martinez, The Grand Rapids (Michigan) Press, 4 Mar. 2018
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 7854
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Riposte    Sat May 26, 2018 10:15 pm

Word of the Day: Riposte  

noun 




Definition

1 : a fencer's quick return thrust following a parry

2 : a retaliatory verbal sally : retort

3 : a retaliatory maneuver or measure

Did You Know?

In the sport of fencing, a riposte is a counterattack made after successfully fending off one's opponent. English speakers borrowed the name for this particular maneuver from French in the early 1700s, but the French had simply modified Italian risposta, which literally means "answer." Ultimately these words come from the Latin verb respondere, meaning "to respond." It seems fitting that riposte has since come full circle to now refer to a quick and witty response performed as a form of retaliation.



Examples

"A riposte to the stuffy awards shows in music-industry centers like Los Angeles and New York, the impetus behind the Bay Area Music Awards was to play it fast, loose and irreverent." — Aidin Vaziri, The San Francisco Chronicle, 20 Mar. 2018
"Director Phyllida Lloyd delivers a riposte to the idea that cinema derived from theatre is somehow a static, inflexible affair with her vital all-female production of Julius Caesar." — Screen International, 25 June 2017
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 7854
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Arrogate    Sun May 27, 2018 8:08 pm

Word of the Day: Arrogate 

verb 




Definition

1 a : to claim or seize without justification

b : to make undue claims to having : assume

2 : to claim on behalf of another : ascribe

Did You Know?

Arrogate comes from Latin arrogatus, a past participle of the verb arrogare, which means "to appropriate to one's self." The Latin verb, in turn, was formed from the prefix ad- ("to" or "toward") and the verb rogare ("to ask"). You may have noticed that arrogate is similar to the more familiar arrogant. And there is, in fact, a relationship between the two words. Arrogant comes from Latin arrogant- or arrogans, the present participle of arrogare. Arrogant is often applied to that sense of superiority which comes from someone claiming (or arrogating) more consideration than is due to that person's position, dignity, or power.



Examples

The city council has accused the mayor of arrogating decision-making authority to himself that rightly belongs with the council.
"Teenage girls rule in the tart but sweet new Broadway musical Mean Girls. But their system of high-school government is far from a democracy: It's a reign of terror, angst and mall fashions, where popularity is arrogated and then ruthlessly enforced." — Adam Feldman, TimeOut New York, 8 Apr. 2018
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 7854
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Cajole   Mon May 28, 2018 7:20 pm

Word of the Day: Cajole 

verb 




Definition

1 a : to persuade with flattery or gentle urging especially in the face of reluctance : coax

b : to obtain from someone by gentle persuasion

2 : to deceive with soothing words or false promises

Did You Know?

Cajole comes from a French verb, cajoler, which has the same meaning as the English word. You might not think to associate cajole with cage, but some etymologists theorize that cajoler is connected to not one but two words for "cage." One of them is the Anglo-French word cage, from which we borrowed our own cage. It comes from Latin cavea, meaning "cage." The other is the Anglo-French word for "birdcage," which is gaiole. It's an ancestor of our word jail, and it derives from Late Latin caveola, which means "little cage." Anglo-French speakers had a related verb, gaioler, which meant "to chatter like a jay in a cage." It's possible that cajoler is a combination of gaioler and cage.

  


Examples

"Wertheim and the 60 Minutes crew were only permitted into the building's circular library, despite an attempt to cajole former Lampoon president Alice Ju to grant them further access." — Brit McCandless Farmer, CBSNews.com, 8 Apr. 2018
"Designers call the ways marketers and developers cajole and mislead us into giving up our data 'dark patterns,' tactics that exploit flaws and limits in our cognition." — Christopher Mims, The Wall Street Journal, 22 Apr. 2018
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 7854
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Sacrosanct    Tue May 29, 2018 7:26 pm

Word of the Day: Sacrosanct  

adjective 


Definition

1 : most sacred or holy : inviolable

2 : treated as if holy : immune from criticism or violation

Did You Know?

That which is sacrosanct is doubly sacred. Sacrosanct is derived from the Latin sacrosanctus, which is probably from the phrase sacro sanctus ("hallowed by a sacred rite"). The first element of this phrase, sacro, is the ablative case of sacrum ("a sacred rite") and means "by a sacred rite" (sacrum lives on in English anatomy as the name for our pelvic vertebrae—a shortening of os sacrum, which literally means "holy bone"). The second element, sanctus, is the past participle of the Latin sancire, which means "to make sacred." Sanctus has also given English the words saint, sanctimony, sanctify, and sanctuary.


Examples

"Cowperwood's private office … was a solid cherry-wood box in which he could shut himself completely—sight-proof, sound-proof. When the door was closed it was sacrosanct." — Theodore Dreiser, The Titan, 1914
"The launch of Elon Musk's Falcon Heavy from the Kennedy Space Center … was the latest in a series of milestones reviving interest in space. It happened on the sacrosanct stretch of sand along the Florida coast that has witnessed so many epic flights out of the atmosphere." — Christian Davenport, The Washington Post, 11 Feb. 2018
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 7854
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Indigence    Wed May 30, 2018 6:21 pm

Word of the Day: Indigence  

noun 



Definition

: a level of poverty in which real hardship and deprivation are suffered and comforts of life are wholly lacking

Did You Know?

Is your vocabulary impoverished by a lack of synonyms for indigence? We can help. Poverty, penury, want, and destitution all describe the state of someone who is lacking in key resources. Poverty covers the range from severe lack of basic necessities to an absence of material comforts ("the refugees lived in extreme poverty"). Penury suggests a cramping or oppressive lack of money ("illness condemned him to years of penury"). Want and destitution imply extreme, even life-threatening, poverty ("lived in a perpetual state of want"; "the widespread destitution in countries beset by famine"). Indigence, which descends from a Latin verb meaning "to need," implies seriously straitened circumstances and usually connotes the endurance of many hardships and the lack of comforts.



Examples

"But how do the poor minority fare? Perhaps it will be found that just in proportion as some have been placed in outward circumstances above the savage, others have been degraded below him. The luxury of one class is counterbalanced by the indigence of another." — Henry David Thoreau, Walden, 1854
"Indigence isn't rare in Rochester and in Monroe County's towns, given the area's systemic poverty. And for the public defenders' clients, Donaher says, 'any amount of cash bail is an enormous obstacle, because they don't have cash.'" — Tianna Mañón, The Rochester (New York) City Newspaper, 11 Apr. 2018
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 7854
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Chastise    Thu May 31, 2018 8:08 pm

Word of the Day: Chastise  

verb 




Definition

1 : to censure severely : castigate

2 : to inflict punishment on (as by whipping)

Did You Know?

Chastise, castigate, chasten, correct, and discipline all imply the infliction of a penalty in return for wrongdoing. Chastise often applies to verbal censure or denunciation ("she chastised her son for neglecting his studies"). Castigate usually implies a severe, typically public censure ("an editorial was published castigating the entire city council"), while chasten suggests any affliction or trial that leaves someone humbled or subdued ("chastened by a landslide election defeat"). Correct implies punishment aimed at reforming an offender ("the function of prison is to correct the wrongdoer"), and discipline is a punishment intended to bring a wrongdoer under control ("parents disciplining their children").

Examples

The boss eventually had to chastise certain employees for being consistently late.
"Strikingly, each time the company encounters another privacy outcry, its initial response is not to own up to the situation, explain, apologize and listen, but rather to chastise its users for daring to ask." — Kalev Leetaru, Forbes, 6 Apr. 2018
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 7854
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Flummox    Fri Jun 01, 2018 6:52 pm

Word of the Day: Flummox 

verb 



Definition

: confuse

Did You Know?

No one is completely sure where the word flummox comes from, but we do know that early use can be found in Charles Dickens' 1837 novel The Pickwick Papers and that it had become quite common in both British and American English by the end of the 19th century. One theory expressed by some etymologists is that it was influenced by flummock, a word of English dialectical origin used to refer to a clumsy person. This flummock may also be the source of the word lummox, which also means "a clumsy person."


Examples

"A computer glitch at the IRS knocked offline the agency's ability to process many tax returns filed electronically, a stunning breakdown that left agency officials flummoxed and millions of Americans bewildered." — Jeff Stein, Damian Paletta, and Mike DeBonis, The Washington Post, 17 Apr. 2018
"The reason for math's bad rap is that the very same teachers and parents who have psychic scars from their own inability to correctly memorize their multiplication tables in the fourth grade are today completely flummoxed by elementary school kids' homework." — Esther J. Cepeda, The Record (Bergen County, New Jersey), 26 Apr. 2018
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 7854
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Ingenue   Mon Jun 04, 2018 9:01 am

Word of the Day: Ingenue 

noun 




Definition

1 : a naive girl or young woman

2 : the stage role of an ingenue; also : an actress playing such a role

Did You Know?

Although Becky Sharp, the ambitious heroine of William Makepeace Thackeray's 1848 novel Vanity Fair, is not usually thought of as innocent or naive, the author used ingenue to describe her as having those qualities. Thackeray's use was attributive: "When attacked sometimes, Becky had a knack of adopting a demure ingenue air, under which she was most dangerous." The word ingenue typically refers to someone who is innocent to the ways of the world, so you probably won't be too surprised to learn that it shares an ancestor—Latin ingenuus—with ingenuous, a word meaning "showing innocent or childlike simplicity and candidness." More directly, our ingenue comes from French ingénue, the feminine form of ingénu, meaning "ingenuous."


Examples

"Aberra, a native of Ethiopia, helped to change the way that women presented themselves on their wedding day. She recognized that not all women wanted to promenade down the aisle looking like a Disney princess, a sweet ingenue or a modern-day Marie Antoinette." — Robin Givhan, The Washington Post, 3 Apr. 2018

"Tina Fey wrote 'Mean Girls,' but she's no Regina George. On the first day of rehearsals for her new Broadway musical, based on the 2004 hit comedy, she had a message for her cast of ingenues: Avoid the trappings of fame. That meant no diva-like behavior in real life." — Ramin Setoodeh, Variety, 10 Apr. 2018
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 7854
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Proficient    Mon Jun 04, 2018 8:08 pm

Word of the Day: Proficient 

adjective 




Definition

: well advanced in an art, occupation, or branch of knowledge

Did You Know?

If you are proficient or adept at something you are skillful—perhaps even expert. Proficient, adept, skillful, and expert are all synonyms, but subtle differences can be discerned between these terms as well. Proficient usually describes pure ability that comes from training and practice ("a proficient writer"). Adept suggests an innate ability as well as a learned skill ("an adept card player"). Skillful suggests being very able at a particular task ("a skillful surgeon"). Expert suggests having a thorough knowledge of a subject as well as being very skillful at working in it ("expert in the martial arts").



Examples

"The audition process is intense. Rockettes must be proficient in ballet, tap, and jazz. Hundreds of women come to auditions and the line to get into Radio City Music Hall wraps around the building." — Melinda Farrell, USA Today, 1 Nov. 2017
"However, for those looking to improve their performance in virtually every field, taking the time to improve your reading efficiency and vocabulary can pay dividends down the road. In fact, proficient readers usually have better paid jobs and are 2.5 times more likely to earn $850 or more a week." — Macworld, 20 Dec. 2017
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 7854
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Opportune    Tue Jun 05, 2018 8:34 pm

Word of the Day: Opportune  

adjective 



Definition

1 : suitable or convenient for a particular occurrence

2 : occurring at an appropriate time

Did You Know?

To choose any port in a storm is sometimes the most opportune way of proceeding in a difficult situation—and appropriately so, etymologically speaking. Opportune descends from the Latin opportunus, which means "favoring one's needs," "serviceable," and "convenient." Originally, opportunus was probably used of winds with the literal meaning of "blowing in the direction of a harbor." The word is a combination of the prefix ob-, meaning "to," and portus, "port" or "harbor." Latin portus is also at the root of English port. Opportune and port both made their way to English via Anglo-French, with port arriving before the 12th century, and opportune arriving in the 15th century.


Examples

Kristin seized upon the first opportune moment to approach her boss about a raise.
"We believe that the recent momentum and widespread recognition the concept has received makes it an opportune time to introduce the brand to Sacramento." — David Leuterio, The Sacramento (California) Bee, 5 Apr. 2018
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 7854
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Unbeknownst    Thu Jun 07, 2018 6:24 am

Word of the Day: Unbeknownst 

adjective 




Definition

1 : happening or existing without the knowledge of someone specified — usually used with to

2 : not known or not well-known : unknown

Did You Know?

Unbeknownst is an irregular variant of the older unbeknown, which derives from beknown, an obsolete synonym of known. But for a word with a straightforward history, unbeknownst and the now less common unbeknown have caused quite a stir among usage commentators. In spite of widespread use (including appearances in the writings of Charles Dickens, A. E. Housman, and E. B. White), the grammarian H. W. Fowler in 1926 categorized the two words as "out of use except in dialect or uneducated speech." The following year, G. P. Krapp called them "humorous, colloquial, and dialectal." Our evidence, however, shows that both words are standard even in formal prose.


Examples

"… Travis was the one who paid the bills—and he often used credit cards to cover them, unbeknownst to Vonnie." — Penny Wrenn, Forbes.com, 9 Oct. 2013
"… Senate Bill 15, approved unanimously by that House committee Thursday, hopes to help homeowners who find themselves the victim of 'squatting'—people who illegally move into a home, often unbeknownst to the homeowner." — Marianne Goodland, The Gazette (Colorado Springs, Colorado), 12 Apr. 2018
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 7854
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Fustigate    Thu Jun 07, 2018 9:27 pm

Word of the Day: Fustigate  

verb 




Definition

1 : to beat with or as if with a short heavy club : cudgel

2 : to criticize severely

Did You Know?

Though it won't leave a bump on your head, severe criticism can be a blow to your self-esteem. It's no wonder that fustigate, when it first appeared in the 17th century, originally meant "to cudgel or beat with a short heavy stick," a sense that reflects the word's derivation from the Latin noun fustis, which means "club" or "staff." The "criticize" sense is more common these days, but the violent use of fustigate was a hit with earlier writers like George Huddesford, who in 1801 told of an angry Jove who "cudgell'd all the constellations, ... / Swore he'd eject the man i' the moon ... / And fustigate him round his orbit."


Examples

Matthew was thoroughly ­fustigated for failing to reserve a table large enough to accommodate all of the visitors from the corporate main office.
"Ontario Court Justice Charles Vaillancourt …  fustigated them all, effectively characterizing the charges against Duffy as an abuse of power. " — Neil Macdonald, CBC.ca, 23 Apr. 2016
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 7854
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Whelm    Mon Jun 11, 2018 10:38 am

Word of the Day: Whelm 

verb 



Definition

1 : to turn (something, such as a dish or vessel) upside down usually to cover something : to cover or engulf completely with usually disastrous effect

2 : to overcome in thought or feeling : overwhelm

3 : to pass or go over something so as to bury or submerge it

Did You Know?

In the film comedy Ten Things I Hate About You (1999), the character Chastity Church asks, "I know you can be underwhelmed and you can be overwhelmed, but can you ever just be whelmed?" The answer, Chastity, is yes. Contemporary writers sometimes use whelm to denote a middle stage between underwhelm and overwhelm. But that's not how whelm has traditionally been used. Whelm and overwhelm have been with us since Middle English (when they were whelmen and overwhelmen), and throughout the years their meanings have largely overlapped. Both words early on meant "to overturn," for example, and both have also come to mean "to overpower in thought or feeling." After folks started using a third word, underwhelmed, for "unimpressed," whelmed began popping up with the meaning "moderately impressed."



Examples

The hotel was adequate but we were far from whelmed by the view of the alley and the lack of hot water.
"By the time San Jose annexed the town to expand its sewage-treatment plant in 1968, nature had already begun to reclaim the bayside. The town of 2,500 splintered, rusted and sank as groundwater was over-pumped, sea water rose on all sides and storm surges whelmed the backed-up drains." — Jennifer Wadsworth, The San Jose (California) Inside, 8 Dec. 2016
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 7854
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Epithet    Tue Jun 12, 2018 8:09 pm

Word of the Day: Epithet 

noun 


Definition

1 : a characterizing word or phrase accompanying or occurring in place of the name of a person or thing

2 : a disparaging or abusive word or phrase

3 : the part of a taxonomic name identifying a subordinate unit within a genus

Did You Know?

Nowadays, epithet is usually used negatively, with the meaning "a derogatory word or phrase," but it wasn't always that way. Epithet comes to us via Latin from the Greek noun epitheton and ultimately derives from epitithenai, meaning "to put on" or "to add." In its oldest sense, an epithet is simply a descriptive word or phrase, especially one joined by fixed association to the name of someone or something (as in "Peter the Great" or the stock Homeric phrases "gray-eyed Athena" and "wine-dark sea"). Alternatively, epithets may be used in place of a name (as in "the Peacemaker" or "the Eternal"). These neutral meanings of epithet are still in use, but today the word is more often used in its negative "term of disparagement" sense.


Examples

The school's policy makes it clear that derogatory epithets will not be tolerated.
"Herbert Hoover, who could justifiably campaign as a progressive Republican, pigeonholed Smith as an advocate of state socialism (the same epithet that a spiteful Smith would hurl at Roosevelt in 1936)." — Sam Roberts, The New York Times, 22 Apr. 2018
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 7854
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Mantic   Wed Jun 13, 2018 6:28 pm

Word of the Day: Mantic  

adjective 




Definition

: of or relating to the faculty of divination : prophetic

Did You Know?

The adjective mantic comes from the Greek word mantikos, which itself derives from mantis, meaning "prophet." The mantis insect got its name from this same source, supposedly because its posture—with the forelimbs extended as though in prayer—reminded folks of a prophet. Not surprisingly, the combining form -mancy, which means "divination in a (specified) manner" (as in necromancy and pyromancy), is a relative of mantic. A less expected, and more distant, relative is mania, meaning "excitement manifested by mental and physical hyperactivity, disorganized behavior, and elevated mood" or "excessive or unreasonable enthusiasm." Mania descends from Greek mainesthai ("to be mad"), a word akin to mantis and its offspring. And indeed, prophesying in ancient Greece was sometimes believed to be "inspired madness."
  


Examples

The magician mesmerized the crowd with her sleight-of-hand tricks as well as her mantic predictions.
"Like everyone else, I was in awe of her mantic abilities, and I think she looked upon my storytelling endeavors with indulgence, having known both my father and my grandfather in their prime." — Joydeep Roy-Bhattacharya, The Storyteller of Marrakesh, 2011
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 7854
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Defenestration   Fri Jun 15, 2018 8:21 am

Word of the Day: Defenestration
  
noun 




Definition

1 : a throwing of a person or thing out of a window

2 : a usually swift dismissal or expulsion (as from a political party or office)

Did You Know?

These days defenestration is often used to describe the forceful removal of someone from public office or from some other advantageous position. History's most famous defenestration, however, was one in which the tossing out the window was quite literal. On May 23, 1618, two imperial regents were found guilty of violating certain guarantees of religious freedom. As punishment, they were thrown out the window of Prague Castle. The men survived the 50-foot tumble into the moat, but the incident, which became known as the Defenestration of Prague, marked the beginning of the Bohemian resistance to Hapsburg rule that eventually led to the Thirty Years' War.


Examples

Although defenestration may seem an appropriate response to an alarm clock set for too early an hour, the demise of the device does not change the hour of the day.
"It's possible that nobody in Hollywood works harder than Tom Cruise, who, in his latest turn as Ethan Hunt, once again finds himself in a race against time after a mission goes wrong. Expect defenestration, helicopter crashes, and exploding motorbikes." — Vogue (vogue.com), 22 May 2018
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 7854
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Pugnacious    Sun Jun 17, 2018 10:18 pm

Word of the Day: Pugnacious  

adjective 



Definition

: having a quarrelsome or combative nature : truculent

Did You Know?

Pugnacious individuals are often looking for a fight. While unpleasant, at least their fists are packing an etymological punch. Pugnacious comes from the Latin verb pugnare (meaning "to fight"), which in turn comes from the Latin word for "fist," pugnus. Another Latin word related to pugnus is pugil, meaning "boxer." Pugil is the source of our word pugilist, which means "fighter" and is used especially of professional boxers. Pugnare has also given us impugn ("to assail by words or arguments"), oppugn ("to fight against"), and repugnant (which is now used primarily in the sense of "exciting distaste or aversion," but which has also meant "characterized by contradictory opposition" and "hostile").


Examples

"In almost all the Orders, the males of some species, even of weak and delicate kinds, are known to be highly pugnacious; and some few are furnished with special weapons for fighting with their rivals." — Charles Darwin, The Descent of Man,1871
"[Coach Gregg] Popovich, whose interviews can be humorously pugnacious, wasn't in the mood to look back on the streak on Monday night, saying 'Awww, it's wonderful,' without further elaboration." — Victor Mather, The New York Times, 11 Apr. 2018
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 7854
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Abrogate    Mon Jun 18, 2018 9:35 pm

Word of the Day: Abrogate 

verb 

Definition

1 : to abolish by authoritative action : annul

2 : to treat as nonexistent

Did You Know?

If you can't simply wish something out of existence, the next best thing might be to "propose it away." That's more or less what abrogate lets you do—etymologically speaking, at least. Abrogate comes from the Latin root rogare, which means "to propose a law," and ab-, meaning "from" or "away." We won't propose that you try to get away from the fact that rogare is also an ancestor in the family tree of prerogative and interrogate. Abrogate first appeared in English as a verb in the 16th century; it was preceded by an adjective sense meaning "annulled" or "cancelled," which is now obsolete.



Examples

"U.S. deterrence in the Taiwan Strait used to resemble U.S. deterrence elsewhere: Washington had a formal alliance with the Republic of China and stationed troops in Taiwan. But the United States abrogated the alliance treaty when it broke official ties with the Republic of China in 1979." — Scott Kastner, The Washington Post, 30 Apr. 2018
"While we must not engage in partisan political acts such as endorsing candidates and parties, to remain silent on the pressing issues of our time is to abrogate our moral responsibility." — Rabbi Dan Fink, The Idaho Statesman, 21 Apr. 2018
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Sponsored content




PostSubject: Re: Word of the Day   

Back to top Go down
 
Word of the Day
Back to top 
Page 29 of 30Go to page : Previous  1 ... 16 ... 28, 29, 30  Next

Permissions in this forum:You cannot reply to topics in this forum
Alias Smith and Jones Fun and Fanfiction  :: Writers Aids Feel free to contrubute to any of these threads :: Word of the Day - Feel free to contribute to this thread-
Jump to: