Alias Smith and Jones Fun and Fanfiction
Alias Smith and Jones Fun and Fanfiction

A site for all kinds of fun for fans of Alias Smith and Jones
 
HomeHome  PortalPortal  CalendarCalendar  UsergroupsUsergroups  RegisterRegister  Log in  

Share | 
 

 Word of the Day

View previous topic View next topic Go down 
Go to page : Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 11 ... 21  Next
AuthorMessage
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 7231
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Éclat    Thu Jul 14, 2016 9:00 pm

Word of the Day: Éclat
  
  
noun  

 

Definition

1 : ostentatious display : publicity

2 : dazzling effect : brilliance

3 a : brilliant or conspicuous success

b : praise, applause

Examples

"The … protagonist is a familiar archetype, that washed-up star who can't quite reclaim the éclat of decades past." — Kevin Zawacki, Paste, 25 Aug. 2014

"A woman, a hostess, could play an important subterfuge.… She could serve dinner with éclat, put people at ease, and spice the conversation with the wit that obscured the politics in political discussions." — Louisa Thomas, New York Magazine, 14 Apr. 2016


Did You Know?

Éclat burst onto the scene in English in the 17th century. The word derives from French, where it can mean "splinter" (the French idiom voler en éclats means "to fly into pieces") as well as "burst" (un éclat de rire means "a burst of laughter"), among other things. The "burst" sense is reflected in the earliest English sense of the word, meaning "ostentatious display or publicity." This sense found its own idiomatic usage in the phrase "to make an éclat," which at one time meant "to create a sensation." By the 1740s, éclat took on the additional meaning of "applause or acclamation," as in "The performer was received with great éclat."
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 7231
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Ostracize   Fri Jul 15, 2016 9:52 pm

Word of the Day: Ostracize
  
  
verb  

 

Definition

1 : to exile by ostracism

2 : to exclude from a group by common consent

Examples

Athletes who cheat risk being ostracized by their peers and colleagues—in addition to suffering professional ruin.

"Hateful speech is employed to offend, marginalize and ostracize. It's replaced reasonable persuasion by those too lazy or ignorant to be thoughtful." — Tom Fulks, The San Luis Obispo (California) Tribune, 26 Dec. 2015

 

Did You Know?

In ancient Greece, prominent citizens whose power or influence threatened the stability of the state could be exiled by a practice called ostracism. Voters would elect to banish another citizen by writing that citizen's name down on a potsherd. Those receiving enough votes would then be subject to temporary exile from the state (usually for ten years). The English verb ostracize can mean "to exile by the ancient method of ostracism," but these days it usually refers to the general exclusion of one person from a group at the agreement of its members. Ostracism and ostracize derive from the Greek ostrakizein ("to banish by voting with potsherds"). Its ancestor, the Greek ostrakon ("shell" or "potsherd"), also helped to give English the word oyster.
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 7231
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Caesura   Sat Jul 16, 2016 9:10 pm

Word of the Day: Caesura

  
noun  
 

Definition

1 : a break in the flow of sound usually in the middle of a line of verse

2 : break, interruption

3 : a pause marking a rhythmic point of division in a melody

Examples

"The Anglo-Saxon idiom of Beowulf sounds particularly alien to modern ears: four stresses per line, separated in the middle by a strong pause, or caesura, with the third stress in each line alliterating with one or both of the first two." — Paul Gray, Time, 20 Mar. 2000

"Whenever anyone asks what I studied in school, the caesura of a deep breath inserts itself before the next line—the time it takes to summon the strength it takes to summon the word: 'poetry.'" — Michael Andor Brodeur, The Boston Globe, 14 June 2016

Did You Know?

Caesuras (or caesurae) are those slight pauses one makes as one reads verse. While it may seem that their most obvious role is to emphasize the metrical construction of the verse, more often we need these little stops (which may be, but are not necessarily, set off by punctuation) to introduce the cadence and phrasing of natural speech into the metrical scheme. The word caesura, borrowed from Late Latin, is ultimately from Latin caedere meaning "to cut." Nearly as old as the 450-year-old poetry senses is the general meaning of "a break or interruption."
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 7231
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Parlay   Mon Jul 18, 2016 9:05 am

Word of the Day: Parlay
 
  
verb  

 

Definition

1 : to bet in a parlay

2 a : to exploit successfully

b : to increase or otherwise transform into something of much greater value

Examples

"Leong said she parlayed a measly $5 winning ticket into her big bonanza. First she exchanged the $5 winning ticket for another that won $10, and with that she bought a $10 ticket that won $100. She decided to try her luck two more times and used the winnings to buy two $20 tickets, one of which hit the mother lode." — Megan Cerullo & Nancy Dillon, The New York Daily News, 8 June 2016

"Johnson parlayed the experience she gained while writing her own fashion and lifestyle blog into her first job at New York social media marketing agency Attention." — Samantha Masunaga, The Waterbury (Connecticut) Republican-American, 13 June 2016



Did You Know?

If you're the gambling type, you may already know that parlay can also be used as a noun describing a series of bets in which a person places a bet, then puts the original stake of money and all of its winnings on new wagers. But you might not know that parlay represents a modified spelling of the French name for such bets: paroli. You might also be unaware that the original French word is still occasionally used in English with the same meaning as the noun parlay. Be careful not to mix up parlay with the similar word parley, meaning "to discuss terms with an enemy." Although the spellings are very close, parley comes from the Latin word for "speech."
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 7231
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Astute   Mon Jul 18, 2016 7:04 pm

Word of the Day: Astute
  
  
adjective  


 

Definition

1 : having or showing shrewdness and perspicacity

2 : crafty, wily

Examples

The candidate made a number of astute observations about both foreign and domestic policy during the debate.

"Sure, he was funny, but George Carlin was also an astute observer of the way humans think and behave." — Keith Magill, The Shawnee (Oklahoma) News-Star, 12 June 2016

 

Did You Know?

Astute is similar in meaning to shrewd and sagacious, but there are subtle differences in connotation among them. All three suggest sharp thinking and sound judgment, but shrewd stresses practical, hardheaded cleverness and judgment ("a shrewd judge of character"), whereas sagacious implies wisdom and foresight combined with good judgment ("sagacious investors"). Astute, which derives from the Latin noun astus, meaning "craft," suggests cleverness, mental sharpness, and diplomatic skill ("an astute player of party politics").
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 7231
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Raconteur   Tue Jul 19, 2016 8:17 pm

Word of the Day: Raconteur
 
  
noun  

 

Definition

: a person who excels in telling anecdotes

Examples

A bona fide raconteur, Taylor can turn even mundane experiences into hilariously entertaining stories.

"Her fans, any of whom would welcome the chance to share … a bowl of pimento cheese with her, know [Julia] Reed as a tremendous wit, a sharp observer of the complexities of Southern culture, a great storyteller and fabulous raconteur." — Greg Morago, The Houston Chronicle, 1 June 2016

 
Did You Know?

The story of raconteur is a tale of telling and counting. English speakers borrowed the word from French, where it traces back to the Old French verb raconter, meaning "to tell." Raconter in turn was formed from another Old French verb, aconter or acompter, meaning "to tell" or "to count," which is ultimately from Latin computare, meaning "to count." Computare is also the source of our words count and account. Raconteur has been part of the English vocabulary since at least 1828.
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 7231
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Tactile   Thu Jul 21, 2016 7:48 am

Word of the Day: Tactile
  
  
adjective  

 

Definition

1 : perceptible by touch : tangible

2 : of, relating to, or being the sense of touch

Examples

"The keyboard has good tactile feedback, and the touch pad is responsive without being too twitchy." — Bruce Brown, PC Magazine, 20 Feb. 2001

"Sensitive 'robot skin' was developed by researchers at Georgia Tech in 2014. The skin makes use of flexible touch sensors that communicate with a memory device that can store tactile interactions, mimicking human sensory memory." — Karen Turner, The San Diego Union Tribune, 29 May 2016

 
Did You Know?

Tangible is related to tactile, and so are intact, tact, contingent, tangent, and even entire. There's also the uncommon noun taction, meaning "the act of touching." Like tactile, all of these words can be traced back to the Latin verb tangere, meaning "to touch." Tactile was adopted by English speakers in the early 17th century (possibly by way of the French tactile) from the Latin adjective tactilis ("tangible"). Tactilis comes from tactus, a past participle of tangere.
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 7231
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Winkle   Thu Jul 21, 2016 8:19 pm

Word of the Day: Winkle

  
verb  
 

Definition

1 : (chiefly British) to displace, remove, or evict from a position

2 : (Chiefly British) to obtain or draw out by effort

Examples

"In 1483 a new English king, Richard III, tried again to winkle Henry out of Brittany, but he found that the young man was now a significant pawn on the European chessboard." — Nigel Calder, The English Channel, 1986

"The reclusive actress, 48, had been winkled out of her New Mexico ranch and flown halfway around the world only to stand there and be ignored as Amal battled with her chiffon frills and the cameras rattled like gunfire." — Jan Moir, The Daily Mail (UK), 20 May 2016

 


Did You Know?

If you have ever extracted a winkle from its shell, then you understand how the verb winkle came to be. The word winkle is short for periwinkle, the name of a marine or freshwater snail. Periwinkle is ultimately derived from Latin pina, the name of a mussel, and Old English wincle, a snail shell. Evidently the personnel of World War I's Allied Powers found their duty of finding and removing the enemy from the trenches analogous to extracting a well-entrenched snail and began using winkle to describe their efforts. The action of "winkling the enemy out" was later extended to other situations, such as "winkling information out of someone."
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 7231
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Usufruct   Fri Jul 22, 2016 8:04 pm

Word of the Day: Usufruct
 
  
noun  

 

Definition

1 : the legal right of using and enjoying the fruits or profits of something belonging to another

2 : the right to use or enjoy something

Examples

He has willed all of his property to the conservation society, though his children will retain the house as a 50-year usufruct.

"When there's no will, the state of Louisiana gives the surviving spouse a usufruct on the property." — Mary Anna Evans, Plunder, 2012


Did You Know?

Thomas Jefferson said, "The earth belongs in usufruct to the living." He apparently understood that when you hold something in usufruct, you gain something of significant value, but only temporarily. The gains granted by usufruct can be clearly seen in the Latin phrase from which the word developed, usus et fructus, which means "use and enjoyment." Latin speakers condensed that phrase to ususfructus, the term English speakers used as the model for our modern word. Usufruct has been used as a noun for the legal right to use something since the mid-1600s. Any right granted by usufruct ends at a specific point, usually the death of the individual who holds it.
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 7231
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Vatic   Sat Jul 23, 2016 8:25 pm

Word of the Day: Vatic
  
  
adjective  

 

Definition

: prophetic, oracular

Examples

"Compared with [Stan] Lee's wisecracking dialogue and narrative prose, [Jack] Kirby's writing was stilted and often awkward, though at times it rose to a level of vatic poetic eloquence." — Jeet Heer, The New Republic, 7 Aug. 2015

"[Walt Whitman] dreamed of a new democratic civilization, which he pictured ultimately as a worldwide revolutionary democracy of labor—the vision that you can see in his vatic and ecstatic processional poem 'Song of the Broad-Axe.'" — Paul Berman, Tablet (tabletmag.com), 3 May 2016

 

Did You Know?

Some people say only thin lines separate poetry, prophecy, and madness. We don't know if that's generally true, but it is in the case of vatic. The adjective derives directly from the Latin word vates, meaning "seer" or "prophet." But that Latin root is, in turn, distantly related to the Old English wōth, meaning "poetry," the Old High German wuot, meaning "madness," and the Old Irish fáith, meaning both "seer" and "poet."
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 7231
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Simulacrum   Sun Jul 24, 2016 9:00 pm

Word of the Day: Simulacrum

  
noun  
 

Definition

1 : image, representation

2 : an insubstantial form or semblance of something : trace

Examples

"Most theater shows aim to conjure a simulacrum of reality onstage." — Rohan Preston, The Star Tribune (Minneapolis, Minnesota), 21 Apr. 2015

"There, hanging above you, is a simulacrum of a tardigrade, otherwise known as a water bear or moss piglet, at about 5,000 times larger than life-size." — James Gorman, The New York Times, 3 Apr. 2015


Did You Know?

It's not a figment of your imagination; there is a similarity between simulacrum and simulate. Both of those English words derive from simulare, a Latin verb meaning "to copy, represent, or feign." In its earliest English uses, simulacrum named something that provided an image or representation (as, for instance, a portrait, marble statue, or wax figure representing a person). Perhaps because a simulacrum, no matter how skillfully done, is not the real thing, the word gained an extended sense emphasizing the superficiality or insubstantiality of a thing.
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 7231
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Berate   Mon Jul 25, 2016 9:41 pm

Word of the Day: Berate
  

 
verb  

 

Definition

: to scold or condemn vehemently and at length

Examples

When her son arrived home way past curfew without so much as a phone call or text, Nancy berated him for his lack of consideration.

"We'd announced the tour and Mick looked at it and went, 'I can't do this,' which was not great news at all. I wanted to slightly berate him, 'What the heck?!,' but he sounded so sad. He really wasn't up to it." — Paul Rodgers, Billboard.com, 13 April 2016

 

Did You Know?

Berate and rate can both mean "to scold angrily or violently." This sense of rate was first recorded in the 14th century, roughly two centuries before the now more familiar (and etymologically unrelated) rate meaning "to estimate the value of." We know that berate was probably formed by combining be and the older rate, but the origins of this particular rate itself are somewhat more obscure. We can trace the word back to the Middle English form raten, but beyond that things get a little murky. It's possible that rate, and by extension berate, derives from the same ancient word that led to the Swedish rata (meaning "to find blame, despise") and earlier the Old Norse hrata ("to fall, stagger"), but this is uncertain.
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 7231
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Pidgin   Tue Jul 26, 2016 8:26 pm

Word of the Day: Pidgin
  
  
noun  


 

Definition

: a simplified speech used for communication between people with different languages

Examples

"In his 1992 book, A History of American English, the late linguist J.L. Dillard … demonstrates that the most originally American form of English was a pidgin, originating with sailor's language. Early explorers of North America, he argues, would have used nautical pidgins and passed those on to native people." — Sarah Laskow, Atlas Obscura, 17 July 2015

"Hawaiian Pidgin English developed during the 1800s and early 1900s, when immigrant laborers from China, Portugal, and the Philippines arrived to work in the plantations; American missionaries also came around that time. The immigrants used pidgins—first one that was based in Hawaiian and then one based in English—to communicate." — Alia Wong, The Atlantic, 20 Nov. 2015
 

Did You Know?

The history of pidgin begins in the early 19th century in the South China city of Guangzhou. Chinese merchants interacting with English speakers on the docks in this port adopted and modified the word business in a way that, by century's end, had become pidgin. The word itself then became the descriptor of the unique communication used by people who speak different languages. Pidgins generally consist of small vocabularies (Chinese Pidgin English has only 700 words), but some have grown to become a group's native language. Examples include Sea Island Creole (spoken in South Carolina's Sea Islands), Haitian Creole, and Louisiana Creole. The word pidgin also gave us one particular meaning of pigeon—the one defined as "an object of special concern" or "accepted business or interest," as in "Tennis is not my pigeon."
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 7231
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Doff   Wed Jul 27, 2016 8:13 pm

Word of the Day: Doff
  
  
verb  

 

Definition

1 a : to remove (an article of wear) from the body

b : to take off (the hat) in greeting or as a sign of respect

2 : to rid oneself of : put aside

Examples

We'd only planned to stop briefly at the pond, but the children couldn't resist doffing their shoes and were quickly waist-deep in the cool water.

"He received a standing ovation when he batted in the second inning. He stepped out of the batter's box and doffed his helmet to the 36,491 fans." — Michael Kelly, The Boston Herald, 28 June 2016



Did You Know?

Time was, people talked about doffing and donning articles of wear with about the same frequency. But in the mid-19th century the verb don became significantly more popular and left doff to flounder a bit in linguistic semi-obscurity. Doff and don have been a pair from the start: both date to the 14th century, with doff coming from a phrase meaning "to do off" and don from one meaning "to do on." Shakespeare was first, as far as we know, to use the word as it's defined at sense 2. He put it in Juliet's mouth: "What's in a name? That which we call a rose / By any other name would smell as sweet. / … Romeo, doff thy name; / And for that name, which is no part of thee, / Take all myself."
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 7231
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Numinous   Thu Jul 28, 2016 9:02 pm

Word of the Day: Numinous
  
  
adjective 



 

Definition

1 : supernatural, mysterious

2 : filled with a sense of the presence of divinity : holy

3 : appealing to the higher emotions or to the aesthetic sense : spiritual

Examples

Pilgrims to the shrine spoke to the congregation about their numinous experiences.

"… the stories, different as they were from one another, shared a sense of horror as something numinous and elusive, too tricky to be approached head-on." — Terrence Rafferty, The New York Times, 5 June 2016


Did You Know?

Numinous is from the Latin word numen, meaning "divine will" or "nod" (it suggests a figurative nodding, of assent or of command, of the divine head). English speakers have been using numen for centuries with the meaning "a spiritual force or influence." We began using numinous in the mid-1600s, subsequently endowing it with several senses: "supernatural" or "mysterious" (as in "possessed of a numinous energy force"), "holy" (as in "the numinous atmosphere of the catacombs"), and "appealing to the aesthetic sense" (as in "the numinous nuances of her art"). We also created the nouns numinousness and numinosity, although these are rare.
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 7231
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Flounder   Fri Jul 29, 2016 9:20 pm

Word of the Day: Flounder
 
  
verb  


 

Definition

1 : to struggle to move or obtain footing : thrash about wildly

2 : to proceed or act clumsily or ineffectually

Examples

"The four Royal Air Force pilots ditched their broken bomber and dropped into the North Sea, near Britain. It was February 23, 1942…. Floundering in the frigid water, the pilots released their last hope: a tiny, bedraggled carrier pigeon named Winkie." — Sarah Kaplan, The Washington Post, 9 June 2016

"But She-Ra's sales floundered from the start. Roger Sweet, a Mattel toy creator and the author of Mastering the Universe, estimated her total sales at $60 million, an anemic number compared with He-Man ($2 billion) or Barbie ($350 million)." — Maria Teresa Hart, The Atlantic, 16 June 2016



Did You Know?

Despite the fact that flounder is a relatively common English verb, its origins in the language remain obscure. It is thought that it may be an alteration of an older verb, founder. To founder is to become disabled, to give way or collapse, or to come to grief or to fail. In the case of a waterborne vessel, to founder is to sink. The oldest of these senses of founder, "to become disabled," was also used, particularly in reference to a horse and its rider, for the act of stumbling violently or collapsing. It may have been this sense of founder that later appeared in altered form as flounder in the sense of "to stumble."
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 7231
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Littoral   Sat Jul 30, 2016 8:08 pm

Word of the Day: Littoral

  
adjective  


 

Definition

: of, relating to, or situated or growing on or near a shore especially of the sea

Examples

The report shows dramatic improvement in the condition of the state's littoral waters since the cleanup effort began.

"But this project will permanently add new sand to the beach and dune system of Dauphin Island's East End, and the new sand will stay in the littoral system for centuries." — Scott Douglass, The Mobile (Alabama) Register, 6 Mar. 2016
 

Did You Know?

You're most likely to encounter littoral in contexts relating to the military and marine sciences. A littoral combat ship is a fast and easily maneuverable combat ship built for use in coastal waters. And in marine ecology, the littoral zone is a coastal zone characterized by abundant dissolved oxygen, sunlight, nutrients, and generally high wave energies and water motion. Littoral can also be found as a noun referring to a coastal region or, more technically, to the shore zone between the high tide and low tide points. The adjective is the older of the two, dating from the mid-17th century; the noun dates from the early 19th century. The word comes to English from Latin litoralis, itself from litor- or litus, meaning "seashore."
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 7231
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Homily   Sun Jul 31, 2016 8:10 pm

Word of the Day: Homily

  
noun  


 

Definition

1 : a usually short sermon

2 : a lecture or discourse on a moral theme

3 : an inspirational catchphrase; also : platitude

Examples

The calendar features serene photographs captioned by inspirational proverbs and homilies.

"Deacons are ordained ministers in the Catholic Church but do not have the rank of priest. They can give homilies and preside at weddings, funerals and baptisms, but they cannot celebrate Mass." — Tom Kington, The Los Angeles Times, 13 May 2016

 
Did You Know?

Gather around for the history of homily. The story starts with ancient Greek homilos, meaning "crowd" or "assembly." Greeks used homilos to create the verb homilein ("to consort with" or "to address"), as well as the noun homilia ("conversation"). Latin speakers borrowed homilia, then passed it on to Anglo-French. By the time it crossed into Middle English, the spelling had shifted to omelie, but by the mid-16th century the term had regained its "h" and the "y" of the modern spelling was added.
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 7231
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Kerfuffle   Mon Aug 01, 2016 9:07 pm

Word of the Day: Kerfuffle

  
noun  

 

Definition

: (chiefly British) disturbance, fuss

Examples

I didn't mean to start such a kerfuffle when I suggested that we hold the company picnic at a different location this year.

"… there was quite a kerfuffle (in visual-arts circles, anyway) this fall when the Jeff Wall show that was supposed to open the museum was suddenly cancelled by the artist. The works had become unavailable." — Marsha Lederman, The Globe and Mail (Toronto, Ontario), 4 Dec. 2015

 
Did You Know?

Fuffle was first used in Scottish English, as early as the 16th century, as a verb meaning "to dishevel." The addition of the prefix car- (possibly derived from a Scottish Gaelic word meaning "wrong" or "awkward") didn't change the meaning of the word considerably. In the 19th century carfuffle, with its variant curfuffle, became a noun, and in the 20th century it was embraced by a broader population of English speakers and standardized to kerfuffle. There is some dispute among language historians over how the altered spelling came to be favored. One theory holds that it might have been influenced by imitative words like kerplunk, where the syllable ker- is simply added for emphasis.
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 7231
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Glower   Wed Aug 03, 2016 7:24 am

Word of the Day: Glower

  
verb 
 

Defiinition; to look or stare with sullen annoyance or anger

Examples

Kelly glowered at me after I sided with Brenda in their dispute about the chores.

"Outside the subway stop, he glowered for each photo, then bade each of his fans farewell with a stately handshake. He never spoke a word." — Steven Borowiec, The Orlando (Florida) Sentinel, 1 May 2016



Did You Know?

Do words of uncertain origin make you scowl? If so, glower may put a frown on your face because only part of its history can be validated. The well-established part of its story leads us to Scotland, where glower (or glowren, to use the older Scottish form of the word) has been used since the late Middle Ages. Originally, the word meant simply "to look intently" or "to stare in amazement," but by the late 1700s, glowering stares were being associated with anger instead of astonishment. Beyond that, however, the history of the word is murky. The most we can say is that glower is a distant relative of Middle Low German gluren, which means "to be overcast," and of Middle Dutch gloeren, meaning "to leer."
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 7231
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Amity   Wed Aug 03, 2016 9:18 pm

Word of the Day: Amity
 
  
noun  


 

Definition

: friendship; especially : friendly relations between nations

Examples

"Cousin friendships really are special. They provide an unmatched level of amity and support, without the rivalries that often exist between siblings." — Helaine Becker, Today's Parent, June 2006

"The amity between the two leaders was palpable from the start as Mr. Modi broke with protocol to greet Mr. Obama at the airport with a warm handshake and hug." — Peter Baker and Ellen Barry, The New York Times, 26 Jan. 2015


Did You Know?

Amity has been used in English to describe friendship or friendliness for well over 500 years. It is derived from the Latin word for "friend," amicus, and has come to be used especially for relationships between political leaders and nations in which goodwill is shown despite differences that might exist between the two parties. Amicus is also the root of the adjectives amiable and amicable. Amiable implies having qualities that make one liked and easy to deal with—for example, "The owners of the bed-and-breakfast were very amiable." Amicable is closer in meaning to amity: it implies friendliness and politeness with the desire to avoid disagreement and argument. A relationship between coworkers might be described as amicable. Other family members of amicus are the Spanish borrowing amigo ("friend") and the antonymous enemy, which developed from the Latin combination of the prefix in- ("not") with amicus.
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 7231
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Edify   Thu Aug 04, 2016 8:50 pm

Word of the Day: Edify
 
verb  
 

Definition

: to instruct and improve especially in moral and religious knowledge : uplift; also : enlighten, inform

Examples

"Reading Lawrence, I am amazed and edified by the raw emotional intensity of his characters. I’m looking for ways to internalize this rich, untamed emotion and try to impart something of it to the characters who come to life in my keyboard." — A. B. Yehoshua, quoted in The New York Times Book Review, 16 June 2016

"He said he hopes the group takes away the community they began to build, so they can unify and edify each other to do the work of recovery." — Taylor Stuck, The Herald-Dispatch (Huntington, West Virginia), 15 May 2016

 
Did You Know?

The Latin noun aedes, meaning "house" or "temple," is the root of aedificare, a verb meaning "to erect a house." Generations of speakers built on that meaning, and by the Late Latin period, the verb had gained the figurative sense of "to instruct or improve spiritually." The word eventually passed through Anglo-French before Middle English speakers adopted it as edify during the 14th century. Two of its early meanings, "to build" and "to establish," are now considered archaic; the only current sense of edify is essentially the same as that figurative meaning in Late Latin, "to instruct and improve in moral and religious knowledge."
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 7231
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Kith   Fri Aug 05, 2016 9:52 pm

Word of the Day: Kith
  
noun  

 

Definition

: familiar friends, neighbors, or relatives

Examples

"The joy of returning to kith and kin was greater than all her former joys. … Never before … had Shelby seen such an outpouring of affection." — Dorothy West, The Wedding, 1995

"Cooking and sharing food are inseparable. Our labor in the kitchen culminates not in profit but in praise … and it makes sweating in the kitchen worth it—the more so when kith and kin … gather around a holiday table." — Ken Albala, The San Francisco Chronicle, 23 Nov. 2014

  

Did You Know?

Kith has had many meanings over the years. In its earliest uses it referred to knowledge of something, but that meaning died out in the 1400s. Another sense, "one's native land," had come and gone by the early 1500s. The sense "friends, fellow countrymen, or neighbors" developed before the 12th century and was sometimes used as a synonym of kinsfolk. That last sense got kith into hot water after people began using the word in the alliterative phrase "kith and kin." Over the years, usage commentators have complained that kith means the same thing as kin, so "kith and kin" is redundant. Clearly, they have overlooked some other historical definitions, but if you want to avoid redundancy charges, be sure to include friends as well as relatives among your "kith and kin."
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 7231
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Misanthrope   Sat Aug 06, 2016 9:38 pm

Word of the Day: Misanthrope
  
  
noun  


 

Definition

: a person who hates or distrusts humankind

Examples

"The conventional image of Groucho [Marx] was that he was on the side of the little guy, and he spoke defiantly and insolently to powerful people and wealthy people. But my feeling is that Groucho was out to deflate everybody—that he was a thoroughgoing misanthrope." — Lee Siegel, speaking on NPR, 23 Jan. 2016

"Many feared that we would become asocial creatures, misanthropes who would rather hide behind the safety of a screen than face the intimacy of a spoken conversation." — Jenna Wortham, The New York Times, 22 May 2016

 
Did You Know?

The word misanthrope is human to the core—literally. One of its parents is the Greek noun anthropos, meaning "human being." Its other parent is the Greek verb misein, meaning "to hate." Misein also gave English misogamy ("a hatred of marriage"), misogyny ("hatred of women"), misology ("a hatred of argument, reasoning, or enlightenment"), and misoneism ("a hatred, fear, or intolerance of innovation or change"). Anthropos also joined forces with phil- (a combining form meaning "loving") to form the Greek ancestor of philanthropy ("active effort to help other people"). We also find anthropos when we delve into the foundations of the word anthropology.
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 7231
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Devotion   Sun Aug 07, 2016 9:49 pm

Word of the Day: Devotion

  
noun  


Definition

1 a : religious fervor : piety

b : a religious exercise or practice for private use

2 : the act of devoting

b :  the fact or state of being ardently dedicated and loyal

Examples

"Intensely competitive and a gifted athlete, [Mariano]  Rivera will delight baseball fans. But the memories recounted here … ultimately reveal something deeper: Rivera's almost incredible humility, unshakeable faith, and devotion to his family (he married his childhood sweetheart, Clara)." — Publisher's Weekly Review, 12 Mar. 2014

"Precious made headlines last December for her act of devotion. The protective dog with big brown eyes guarded her owner after a fire broke out at their … home." — Erica Jones, NBCWashington.com, 23 July 2016

 
Did You Know?

When we take a vow, we pledge our devotion—whether to remain true to a partner, to uphold the law, or to honor the word of God. It should be no surprise then that devotion and its related verb devote come from the act of taking a vow. Both words originate from Latin devotus, which is the past participle of devovēre, a union of the prefix de- ("from") and the verb vovēre ("to vow"). Devote was once used as an adjective that could mean either "devout" or "devoted." While devout often connotes faithfulness of a religious nature, the adjective devoted conveys the sense of one's commitment to another through love and loyalty ("a devoted husband and father"; "the singer's devoted fans").
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Sponsored content




PostSubject: Re: Word of the Day   

Back to top Go down
 
Word of the Day
View previous topic View next topic Back to top 
Page 2 of 21Go to page : Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 11 ... 21  Next

Permissions in this forum:You cannot reply to topics in this forum
Alias Smith and Jones Fun and Fanfiction  :: Writers Aids Feel free to contrubute to any of these threads :: Word of the Day - Feel free to contribute to this thread-
Jump to: