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PostSubject: Word of the Day: Sedentary   Wed Apr 13, 2016 6:57 am

Word of the Day: Sedentary
 
  
adjective  

 

Definition

1 : not migratory : settled 

2 a : doing or requiring much sitting 

b : not physically active 

3 : permanently attached 

Examples

Erica much preferred working outside in the fresh air to the sedentary office job she held last summer.

"It's well known that leading a sedentary life is detrimental to long-term health and puts a person at higher risk for chronic conditions such as heart disease, diabetes and cancer. But research shows that spending more time on the couch and less time being active is also a fast-track to cognitive decline." — Jessica Firger, Newsweek, 10 Feb. 2016

 
Did You Know?

English speakers borrowed sedentary in the late 16th century from Middle French sedentaire, which in turn derives from Latin sedentarius. Sedentarius, which means "of one that sits," is from the present participle of the verb sedēre, meaning "to sit." Other descendants of sedēre in English include dissident, insidious, preside, reside, and subsidy. Sedēre is also the base of the rare word sedens, a noun meaning "a person who remains a resident of the place or region of his birth."
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PostSubject: Word of the Day: Canaille   Thu Apr 14, 2016 8:43 am

Word of the Day: Canaille
 
noun 

  
 

Definition

1 : rabble, riffraff

2 : proletarian

Examples

"I am not going to write for [The New York Weekly]—like all other papers that pay one splendidly, it circulates among stupid people & the canaille." — Mark Twain, letter, 1 June 1867

"Where the beau monde leads, the canaille will follow." — Richard Brookhiser, The New York Observer,12 May 2003

 

Did You Know?

For a creature said to be man's best friend, the dog doesn't get a whole lot of respect in the English language. Something that has "gone to the dogs," for example, has gone to ruin, and the Britishism dog's breakfast means a confused mess of something. The word canaille, which debuted in English in the 17th century, shows that we have no qualms about associating dogs with the lower levels of human society; it derives via French from Italian canaglia, and ultimately from canis, the Latin word for "dog." Canis, of course, is also the source of canine, which as a noun refers to a dog (as well as a conical pointed tooth), and as an adjective means "of or relating to dogs or to the family to which they belong."
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PostSubject: Word of the Day: Galvanize    Fri Apr 15, 2016 8:20 am

Word of the Day: Galvanize 
  
verb  
 

Definition

1 : to subject to the action of an electric current especially for the purpose of stimulating physiologically 

2 a : to stimulate or excite as if by an electric shock 

b : to react as if stimulated by an electric shock

3 : to coat (iron or steel) with zinc; especially : to immerse in molten zinc to produce a coating of zinc-iron alloy

Examples

The singer was amazed by how her single tweet galvanized so much support from the Twitter community.

"Prime Minister Narendra Modi's new push for accessibility has galvanized a disability rights movement in a country with a notably poor record on inclusive infrastructure." — Rama Lakshmi, The Washington Post, 21 Mar. 2016 

 
Did You Know?

Luigi Galvani was an Italian physician and physicist who, in the 1770s, studied the electrical nature of nerve impulses by applying electrical stimulation to frogs' leg muscles, causing them to contract. Although Galvani's theory that animal tissue contained an innate electrical impulse was disproven, the Italian word galvanismo came to describe a current of electricity especially when produced by chemical action. English speakers borrowed the word as galvanism around 1797; the verb galvanize appeared a few years later, in the early 19th century. Charlotte Brontë used the verb figuratively in her 1853 novel Villette: "Her approach always galvanized him to new and spasmodic life." These days, galvanize also means to cover metal with zinc or a zinc alloy to protect it from rust (as in galvanized carpentry nails).
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PostSubject: Word of the Day: Withy   Sat Apr 16, 2016 8:15 am

Word of the Day: Withy
  
  
noun
 

Definition

1 : willow; especially : one whose pliable twigs are used for furniture and basketry

2 : a flexible slender twig or branch

Examples

"The switch, significantly, is  … a withy of great suppleness and bite, a two-edged sword." — Janette Turner Hospital, The Last Magician, 1992

"'Care to walk up wi' me, Sassenach? It's a fine morning, and ye can bring your wee basket.' He cocked an ironic eye at the enormous withy basket I used for gathering." — Diana Gabaldon, Outlander, 1991

 
Did You Know?

Withy is a word with several synonyms. In its broadest use, it is simply another word for "willow," but it can also be used for a particular category of willows which are also known by the name osier. Additionally, the word withe can be substituted for the "flexible slender twig or branch" sense of withy. Osier entered English from medieval French, whereas willow, withy, and withe all have their origins in Old English. Willow comes from welig; withy comes from wīthig; and withe comes from withthe, a word indirectly related to wīthig.
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PostSubject: Word of the day: Nemorous   Sat Apr 16, 2016 7:19 pm

Word of the day:  Nemorous


Adjective


Definition

Forested; full of trees, dark with shady groves. 


Examples

1889: Even Paradise itself, says Evelyn, was but a kind of ‘nemorous temple or sacred grove,’ planted by God himself — Thomas Thisleton-Dyer, The Folk Lore of Plants (Kessinger 2004, p. 22)


Did you know?

Nemorous is derived from the Latin, nemus, nemor - ‘grove’.  The gorals are four species in the genus Nemorhaedus or Naemorhedus. They are small ungulates with a goat-like or antelope-like appearance.  The original name is based on Latin nemor-haedus, from nemus, nemoris 'grove' and haedus 'little goat', but was misspelt Naemorhedus by Hamilton Smith (1827).  Until recently, this genus also contained the serow species (now in genus Capricornis). The name "goral" comes from an eastern Indian word for the Himalayan goral.
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PostSubject: Word of the Day: Fossick   Sun Apr 17, 2016 8:33 pm

Word of the Day: Fossick

  
verb


Definition

1 : (Australia & New Zealand) to search about especially for gold or gemstones

2 : (chiefly Australia & New Zealand) to search about : rummage

Examples

As teenagers, the twins spent many summer afternoons fossicking for opals in the old mine.

"McDowall outlines the last day's activities: a morning jaunt to Southport…, then the afternoon at Franklin discovering the Wooden Boat Centre, fossicking for antiques and having a pint at a colourful local bar." — Kendall Hill, The Australian, 20 Feb. 2016

 

Did You Know?

The first people to fossick (in the oldest and still-current meaning of the word), back in the 1850s, were picking over abandoned mining excavations in Australia and New Zealand in search of gold or gemstones. But within a few decades fossick was being used more generally to mean "to search about" or "to rummage." Fossick, as we know it, is a native of Down Under, but it may have its origins in a word known to immigrants from the United Kingdom: the dialect term fussock, meaning "to bustle about" or "to fidget."
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PostSubject: Word of the Day: Unctuous    Mon Apr 18, 2016 7:51 pm

Word of the Day: Unctuous
  
  
adjective 

 

Definition

1 a : fatty, oily

b : smooth and greasy in texture or appearance

2 : plastic

3 : insincerely smooth in speech and manner

Examples

Anna was thankful that the unctuous man who first greeted her at the modeling agency would not be the person she would be working with.

"To make the most of its amazing qualities, marinate the lamb for a few hours and then slow-cook the meat. Over time, the layers of fat reduce to sticky, unctuous, lip-smacking perfection and help keep the meat moist…." — Ben Tish, The Guardian, 5 Mar. 2016

 
Did You Know?

Nowadays, unctuous usually has a negative connotation, but it originated as a term describing a positive act, that of healing. The word comes from the Latin verb unguere ("to anoint"), a root that also gave rise to the words unguent ("a soothing or healing salve") and ointment. The oily nature of ointments may have led to the application of unctuous to describe things marked by an artificial gloss of sentimentality. An unctuous individual may mean well, but his or her insincere earnestness can leave an unwelcome residue with others, much like some ointments.
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PostSubject: Word of the Day: Koine   Tue Apr 19, 2016 8:12 pm

Word of the Day: Koine
  
noun 
 

Definition

1 : the Greek language commonly spoken and written in eastern Mediterranean countries in the Hellenistic and Roman periods

2 : a dialect or language of a region that has become the common or standard language of a larger area

Examples

"Examples of koines … include the Hindi/Bhojpuri varieties spoken in Fiji and South Africa, and the speech of 'new towns' such as Høyanger in Norway and Milton Keynes in England." — Paul Kerswill, in The Handbook of Language Variation and Change, 2013

"Hedrick has taken 30 hours of ancient languages—rendering him proficient in koine Greek, Aramaic and ancient Hebrew—and he tutored students in those subjects while in Greece." — Angela Spencer, ArkansasOnline.com, 28 Feb. 2016


Did You Know?

Koine, which means "common" or "shared" in Greek, was the language spoken in the eastern Mediterranean countries from the 4th century B.C.E. until the time of the Byzantine emperor Justinian (mid-6th century C.E.). In linguistics, the word koine is applied to a language developed from contact between dialects of the same language over a large region. Basically, a koine adopts those grammatical and lexical elements from the dialects of the region that are easily recognized by most area speakers and dispenses with those that are not.
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PostSubject: Word of the Day: Piebald   Wed Apr 20, 2016 8:14 pm

Word of the Day: Piebald
 
  
adjective
 

Definition

1 : composed of incongruous parts

2 : of different colors; especially : spotted or blotched with black and white

Examples

The horse she most enjoys riding is a sleek, leggy piebald mare.

"What they did find, though, were some surprise photos of a piebald deer, something few people ever get to see in the woods." — Brenda Charpentier, The New Hampshire Sunday News, 3 Jan. 2016

  

Did You Know?

To many people, the noisy black and white birds that go by the scientific name Pica pica—better known as magpies—are nothing but pests. But the Latin root that was adopted for their name isn't a linguistic nuisance; it played an important role in the development of piebald. The pie of piebald (pie is another name for a magpie) derives from pica, which is Latin for "magpie." The other part of piebald comes from the word bald, which can mean "marked with white"; it can also be found in skewbald, an adjective used to describe animals marked with patches of white and any other color but black.
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PostSubject: Word of the Day: Litany   Thu Apr 21, 2016 8:30 pm

Word of the Day: Litany
 
  
noun 

 

Definition

1 : a prayer consisting of a series of invocations and supplications by the leader with alternate responses by the congregation

2 a : a resonant or repetitive chant

b : a usually lengthy recitation or enumeration

c : a sizable series or set



Examples

"In a silent inner litany, I say 'thank you' for the magnificent gifts of a healthy body: lungs that breathe the cool, foggy air; a nose that smells eucalyptus leaves and banana muffins; eyes that see hummingbirds swooping outside my window; a tongue that has just savored a golden, juicy peach." — Anne Cushman, The Yoga Journal, January/February 2004

"A litany of NFL stars have retired early in recent years, with most of them citing the dangers of football as the primary reason they decided to hang it up." — Alex Reimer, Forbes, 28 Mar. 2016

 
Did You Know?

Litany came to English through Anglo-French and Late Latin, ultimately from the Greek word litaneia, meaning "entreaty." Litany refers literally to a type of prayer in which a series of lines are spoken alternately by a leader and a congregation. This use dates to the 13th century. Between that century and the 20th, three figurative senses developed. The chant-like quality of a literal litany led first to a "repetitive chant" sense. Next, the repetitious—and sometimes interminable—nature of the original litany led to a "lengthy recitation" sense. Finally, the "lengthy recitation" sense was extended to refer to any sizable series or set.
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PostSubject: Word of the Day: Noetic   Fri Apr 22, 2016 9:46 pm

Word of the Day: Noetic
 
  
adjective  


 

Definition

: of, relating to, or based on the intellect

Examples

In addition to her chemistry courses, Elena took electives in philosophy and the classics to satisfy her thirst for noetic stimulation.

"But the new emphasis on curiosity as a noetic virtue adds a note of transcendence to the portrait of the ideal thinker." — John J. Conley, America: The National Catholic Review, 1 Feb. 2016

 
Did You Know?

Noetic derives from the Greek adjective noētikos, meaning "intellectual," from the verb noein ("to think") and ultimately from the noun nous, meaning "mind." (Nous also gave English the word paranoia by joining with a prefix meaning "faulty" or "abnormal.") Noetic is related to noesis, a rare noun that turns up in the field of philosophy and refers to the action of perceiving or thinking. The most notable use of noetic might be in the name of the Institute of Noetic Sciences, a research organization based in California that is devoted to studies of consciousness and the mind.
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PostSubject: Word of the Day: Omniscient   Sun Apr 24, 2016 8:00 am

Word of the Day: Omniscient
 
  
adjective

 

Definition

1 : having infinite awareness, understanding, and insight

2 : possessed of universal or complete knowledge

Examples

The novel opens with an omniscient narrator recalling memories of her twelfth birthday.

"Digital advertisers … are increasingly omniscient: no longer do advertisers know just general things about you—a worldly professional, say, with superb taste in journalism—but they target you, specifically." — The Economist, 26 Mar. 2016

 
Did You Know?

One who is omniscient literally knows all. The word omniscient, which has been part of English since at least the beginning of the 17th century, brings together two Latin roots: the prefix omni-, meaning "all," and the verb scire, meaning "to know." You will recognize omni- as the prefix that tells all in such words as omnivorous ("eating all" or, more precisely, "eating both meat and vegetables") and omnipotent ("all-powerful"). Scire likewise has a number of other knowledge-related descendants in English, including conscience, science, and prescience (meaning "foreknowledge").
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PostSubject: Word of the Day: Exodus   Sun Apr 24, 2016 8:15 pm

Word of the Day: Exodus
 
  
noun  
 

Definition

1 : (capitalized) the mainly narrative second book of canonical Jewish and Christian Scripture

2 : a mass departure : emigration

Examples

When the concert ended, the exodus of attendees clogged up traffic for miles.

"The path of corporate exodus from New York City to New Jersey is well-worn, but real estate brokers and others say that the pace has quickened recently." — Kathleen Lynn, The Record (Bergen County, New Jersey), 28 Feb. 2016

 
Did You Know?

The Biblical book of Exodus describes the departure of the Israelites from Egypt, so it's no surprise that the word has come to refer more generally to any mass departure. The word itself was adopted into English (via Latin) from Greek Exodos, which literally means "the road out." The Greek word was formed by combining the prefix ex- and hodos, meaning "road" or "way." Other descendants of the prolific hodos in English include episode, method, odometer, and period. There are also several scientific words that can be traced back to hodos. Anode and cathode can refer, respectively, to the positive and negative electrodes of a diode, and hodoscope refers to an instrument for tracing the paths of ionizing particles.
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PostSubject: Word of the Day: Juxtapose   Mon Apr 25, 2016 8:59 pm

Word of the Day: Juxtapose
 
  
verb  


 

Definition

: to place side by side (as to compare or contrast)

Examples

Darlene has a keen eye for fashion, and she likes to juxtapose vintage pieces with contemporary styles to create new looks.

"ESPN posted an image of poverty outside Havana's sports stadium last week, to juxtapose the well-kept stadium with the shabby neighborhood around it." — Carolina Miranda, The Los Angeles Times (latimes.com), 28 Mar. 2016

 

Did You Know?

A back-formation is a word that has come about through the removal of a prefix or a suffix from a longer word. Etymologists think juxtapose is a back-formation that was created when people trimmed down the noun juxtaposition. Historical evidence supports the idea: juxtaposition was showing up in English documents as early as 1654, but juxtapose didn't appear until 1851. Juxtaposition is itself thought to be a combination of Latin juxta, meaning "near," and English position.
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PostSubject: Word of the Day: Belvedere   Wed Apr 27, 2016 7:28 am

Word of the Day: Belvedere
 
  
noun 

 

Definition

: a structure (such as a cupola or summerhouse) designed to command a view

Examples

The couple wandered down to the belvedere at the edge of the bluff to take in the vivid colors of the sunset.

"… he chiefly talked of the view from the little belvedere on the roof of the casino, and how it looked like the prospect from a castle turret in a fairy tale." — Henry James, Roderick Hudson, 1875

 

Did You Know?

It is said that beauty is in the eye of the beholder—and someone with a belvedere will likely have a great deal of beauty to behold. Given the origins of the word, belvedere is the ideal term for a building (or part of a building) with a view; it derives from two Italian words, bel, which means "beautiful," and vedere, which means "view." The term has been used in English since the 1570s.
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PostSubject: Word of the Day: Invincible   Thu Apr 28, 2016 6:12 am

Word of the Day: Invincible
 
  
adjective  

 

Definition

: incapable of being conquered, overcome, or subdued

Examples

"He calls the mixture Bulletproof coffee. Drink it, the name implies, and you'll feel invincible." — Gordy Megroz, Bloomberg Businessweek, 4 May 2015

"Eventually he stops terrorizing poor Holly Hunter and retires to Superman's spaceship … where he uses the Krypton Siri to create the invincible supervillain whom Batman and Superman will have to fight after they're done throwing each other through various walls…." — Rob Havilla, Deadspin, 23 Mar. 2016

 

Did You Know?

The origins of invincible are easily subdued. The word derives, via Middle French, from Late Latin invincibilis—a combination of the negative prefix in- with vincibilis, an adjective meaning "conquerable," from the Latin verb vincere, "to conquer." Other descendants of vincere in English include convince, evince, vanquish, and even victor. Vincere also gave English vincible, meaning (unsurprisingly) "capable of being overcome or subdued," though it is significantly less common than invincible.
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PostSubject: Word of the Day: Vagary   Thu Apr 28, 2016 7:11 pm

Word of the Day: Vagary
 
  
noun

 

Definition

: an erratic, unpredictable, or extravagant manifestation, action, or notion

Examples

The vagaries of fashion make it difficult to predict what styles will be popular a year or two from now.

"Being an attentive parent of a small family invariably means that you know, in minute detail, every quirk and vagary of your child's life." — Michael Grose, The Huffington Post, Australia, 15 Feb. 2016

 

Did You Know?

In the 16th century, if you "made a vagary" you took a wandering journey, or you figuratively wandered from a correct path by committing some minor offense. If you spoke or wrote vagaries, you wandered from a main subject. These senses hadn't strayed far from their origin, as vagary is probably based on Latin vagari, meaning "to wander." Indeed, in the 16th and 17th centuries there was even an English verb vagary that meant "to wander." Nowadays, the noun vagary is mostly used in its plural form, and vagaries have more to do with unpredictability than with wandering.
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PostSubject: Word of the Day: Decorous   Sat Apr 30, 2016 8:32 am

Word of the Day: Decorous
  
adjective  

 

Definition

: marked by propriety and good taste : correct

Examples

Before making her daily announcements, the principal mentioned how proud she was of the students' decorous conduct at their prom.

"When, during the constitutional convention in Philadelphia in 1787, the discussion, polite and decorous till then, grew rather heated, Benjamin Franklin implored the delegates as follows: 'It has given me a great pleasure to observe that till this point … our debates were carried on with great coolness and temper. If anything of a contrary kind has on this occasion appeared I hope it will not be repeated….'" — Emanuel Epstein, The Davis (California) Enterprise, 5 Feb. 2016



Did You Know?

The current meaning of decorous dates from the mid-17th century. One of the word's earliest recorded uses appears in a book titled The Rules of Civility (1673): "It is not decorous to look in the Glass, to comb, brush, or do any thing of that nature to ourselves, whilst the said person be in the Room." Decorous for a time had another meaning as well—"fitting or appropriate"—but that now-obsolete sense seems to have existed for only a few decades in the 17th century. Decorous derives from the Latin word decorus, an adjective created from the noun decor, meaning "beauty" or "grace." Decor is akin to the Latin verb decēre ("to be fitting"), which is the source of our adjective decent. It is only fitting, then, that decent can be a synonym of decorous.
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PostSubject: Word of the Day: Beltane   Sun May 01, 2016 9:22 am

Word of the Day: Beltane
 
  
noun 
 

Definition

: the Celtic May Day festival

Examples

Although Beltane celebrates the approach of summer, those attending the Beltane Fire Festival in Edinburgh, Scotland, are warned to dress for the cool weather that is typical of early spring there.

"It's believed that when the goddess wakes from a long winter's sleep in March, she thaws the Earth and starts its life cycle anew. This rebirth, so to speak, is what sets the stage for the Pagan holiday Beltane, a fertility festival that occurs one month later." — Sara Coughlin, Refinery29 (refinery29.com), 18 Mar. 2016

 

Did You Know?

To the ancient Celts, May Day was a critical time when the boundaries between the human and supernatural worlds were removed and people needed to take special measures to protect themselves against enchantments. The Beltane fire festival originated in a spring ritual in which cattle were herded between two huge bonfires to protect them from evil and disease. The earliest known mention of Beltane (formerly spelled beltene, belltaine, and beltine) is in an Old Irish dictionary commonly attributed to Cormac, a king and bishop who lived in Cashel, Ireland, toward the end of the first millennium. The Beltane spelling entered English in the 15th century by way of Scottish Gaelic.
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PostSubject: Word of the Day: Moil   Mon May 02, 2016 10:13 am

Word of the Day: Moil
  
  
verb  
 

Definition

1 : to work hard : drudge

2 : to be in continuous agitation : churn, swirl

Examples

Revelations that the popular motivational speaker was born into a wealthy family cast further doubts on his claims that he holds the secret to finding wealth without the need to toil and moil.

"Playwright Eugene O'Neill moiled over several works, including 'Strange Interlude,' in a summer rental cottage you'll pass if you're on the historical walking tour." — Susan Bayer Ward, The Chicago Daily Herald, 15 May 2005

 

Did You Know?

Moil may mean "to work hard" but its origins are the opposite of hard; it ultimately derives from Latin mollis, meaning "soft." (Other English derivatives of mollis are emollient, mollify, and mollusk.) A more immediate ancestor of moil is the Anglo-French verb moiller, meaning "to make wet, dampen," and one of the early meanings of moil in English was "to become wet and muddy." The "work hard" sense of moil appears most frequently in the pairing "toil and moil." Both moil and toil can also be nouns meaning "work." Moil implies work that is drudgery and toil suggests prolonged and fatiguing labor.
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PostSubject: Word of the Day: Callow   Tue May 03, 2016 4:12 am

Word of the Day: Callow
 
  
adjective 

 

Definition

: lacking adult sophistication : immature

Examples

"So callow was Williams that there was a clause in his first contract, which he signed at the age of 18, that stipulated the team would pay for his mother to be with him at least one week of every month." — Steve Hummer, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, 9 Dec. 2012

"At 5-10, 145 pounds, Justin Thomas, 22, seems too slight and callow to be a good example … of the foundational act on which modern professional golf is built. At least until he springs into his downswing with a driver." — Golf Digest, February 2016

 
Did You Know?

You might not expect a relationship between the word callow and baldness, but that connection does in fact exist. Callow comes from calu, a word that meant "bald" in Middle English and Old English. By the 17th century, callow had come to mean "without feathers" and was applied to young birds not yet ready for flight. The term was also used for those who hadn't yet spread their wings in a figurative sense. Callow continues to mean "inexperienced" or "unsophisticated" today.
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PostSubject: Word of the Day: Wisenheimer   Wed May 04, 2016 9:14 am

Word of the Day: Wisenheimer
 
  
noun 
 

Definition

: smart aleck

Examples

Leslie delivered a flawless presentation even in spite of interruptions from the wisenheimers in the back of the classroom.

"… we both come from incredibly saucy families who love to sling it every which way, so it just seemed natural for us to cross our fingers that any children we had would be little wisenheimers." — Lisa Sugarman, The Daily Ardmoreite (Ardmore, Oklahoma), 20 Dec. 2015

 

Did You Know?

We wouldn't joke around about the origin of this witty word. In the early 20th century, someone had the smart idea to combine the adjective wise (one sense of which means "insolent, smart-alecky, or fresh") with -enheimer, playing on the pattern of family names such as Oppenheimer and Guggenheimer. Of course, wisenheimer isn't the only "wise-" word for someone who jokes around. There's also wiseacre, wisecracker, and wise guy. All of these jokesters are fond of making wisecracks.
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PostSubject: Word of the Day: Mulct   Wed May 04, 2016 8:58 pm

Word of the Day: Mulct
  
  
verb  
 

Definition

1 : to punish by a fine

2 a : to defraud especially of money : swindle

b : to obtain by fraud, duress, or theft

Examples

Francis was finally barred from the securities industry when it was discovered he'd been mulcting investors for years.

"Attacking these firms is a crowd-pleasing sport for lawmakers, in part because every constituent has a story about being mulcted by a card issuer." — Michael Hiltzik, The Los Angeles Times, 4 May 2009

 


Did You Know?

A fine assessed as a penalty for an infraction is generally considered justifiable. Fraud, on the other hand, is wrong—it's just the sort of thing that deserves a fine. So in mulct we have a unique word, one that means both "to fine" and "to defraud." The "fine" sense came first. Mulct was borrowed from the Latin word for a fine, which is multa or mulcta. The "fine" sense is still in use, mostly in legal contexts ("the court mulcted the defendant for punitive damages"), but these days mulct is more often used for an illegal act. It has been speculated that the use may have come about by association with the verb milk, in its sense "to exploit, to coerce profit from" (as in "she was milked by the lawyers for everything she had"), but that speculation has never been proven.
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PostSubject: Word of the Day: Gormandize   Thu May 05, 2016 8:33 pm

Word of the Day: Gormandize

  
verb  

 

Definition

: to eat greedily, gluttonously, or ravenously 

Examples

"People stuff themselves, they gorge, they gormandize; their fingers are greasy from morning to night." — Philippe Sagant, The Dozing Shaman, 1996

"While my ability to gormandize has slackened over the years, my enthusiasm for cooking big has only grown." — Henry Miller, The Statesman Journal (Salem, Oregon), 19 Dec. 2013

 

Did You Know?

Gormandize entered English in the mid-1500s as a modification of gourmand, a term borrowed from the French that served as a synonym of glutton. The meaning of gourmand softened over time, developing in the mid-18th century a sense referring to one who is "heartily interested in good food and drink." It wasn't until the early 19th century that the wholly positive gourmet became established. Whether that now-common word encouraged the adoption of or was influenced by the softer meaning of gourmand is unknown. Gormandize, too, has softened over time, but only slightly: it can now also imply that a big eater has a discriminating palate as well as a generous appetite.
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PostSubject: Word of the Day: Tranche   Fri May 06, 2016 9:22 pm

Word of the Day: Tranche

  
noun  
 

Definition

: a division or portion of a pool or whole

Examples

"JPMorgan Chase must retain 5% of each tranche, or class, of notes to be issued by the trust…. The bank must also comply with disclosure and reporting requirements introduced for securitization…." — Allison Bisbey, The American Banker, 17 Mar. 2016

"The sale of a first tranche of shares to private investors via an initial public offering (IPO) … could start as soon as next year, with the eventual aim of being big enough to potentially buy some of the world's largest companies…." — Terry Macalister, The Guardian, 1 Apr. 2016

 
Did You Know?

In French, tranche means "slice." Cutting deeper into the word's etymology, we find the Old French word trancer, meaning "to cut." Tranche emerged in the English language in the late 19th century to describe financial appropriations. Today, it is often used specifically of an issue of bonds that is differentiated from other issues by such factors as maturity or rate of return. Another use of the French word tranche is in the French phrase une tranche de vie, meaning "a cross section of life." That phrase was coined by the dramatist Jean Jullien (1854-1919), who advocated naturalism in the theater.
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