Alias Smith and Jones Fun and Fanfiction
Alias Smith and Jones Fun and Fanfiction

A site for all kinds of fun for fans of Alias Smith and Jones
 
HomeHome  PortalPortal  CalendarCalendar  UsergroupsUsergroups  RegisterRegister  Log in  

Share | 
 

 Word of the Day -

View previous topic View next topic Go down 
Go to page : Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ... 23 ... 42  Next
AuthorMessage
Admin
Admin


Posts : 6019
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Placid   Thu Nov 14, 2013 5:33 pm

Word of the Day: Placid


Placid is an adjective that means pleased, peaceful or quiet. It comes from the Latin placidus. There is also a lake called Lake Placid, northeast of New York.


"The measure, which is on hold in the state Senate, generated some of the largest rallies ever seen at the normally placid Capitol earlier this year." (USA Today)


"For much of the past two years, investors enjoyed a rising, and rather placid, stock market." (WSJ)
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin


Posts : 6019
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Harangue   Fri Nov 15, 2013 2:32 pm

Word of the Day: Harangue


Harangue is a long speech addressed to a large public assembly. Usually the speech is an offensive one (i.e., a verbal attack), but the word can also indicate pompous or tedious speeches.


"But what started as a spat at a teenage sleepover swiftly escalated into a three-month harangue of threatening e-mails and defacement of her weblog." (USA Today)


"Even as America’s politicians harangue the bankers, the bankers are sniping back." (The Economist)
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin


Posts : 6019
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Ablution   Sat Nov 16, 2013 8:48 am

Word of the Day: Ablution


Ablution is the act of washing or cleansing the body. Usually it refers to a religious rite, and it can also indicate the liquid used in the rite.


"It was in this environment — tense and riddled with suspicion — that Anan says soldiers and police grabbed him, his father and several others at ablution before morning prayers." (USA Today)


"Because the mosque itself has what may seem like an off-balanced placement on its lot — it faces Mecca — the new school was designed in relation to that placement, and also in relation to the ablution room." (NY Times)
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin


Posts : 6019
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Minion   Sun Nov 17, 2013 8:07 am

Word of the Day: Minion


Minion, used as a noun, means a subordinate or servile follower of another person. It can also mean a highly esteemed one. Used as an adjective minion means pretty or dainty.


"For it was pity that blasted the life of a certain British Milquetoast named Arthur Rowe, pity that lured him between the tiger-smooth paws of Hitler’s minion." (NY Times)


"As Meryl Streep’s high-strung minion in “The Devil Wears Prada,” Blunt delighted critics and audiences alike with her arch one-liners and eye shadow for miles." (LA Times)
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin


Posts : 6019
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Rife   Mon Nov 18, 2013 6:33 am

Word of the Day: Rife

Rife is an adjective which means abundant, prevalent, or of common occurrence.


"In an opaque justice system rife with corruption, who you know may matter more than what you know about the law." (LA Times)


"The microblogging site was rife with commentary and erroneous theories about the troublesome strain of swine flu that has sickened more than 1,000 in Mexico and at least 40 in the U.S. and appears to be spreading." (Houston Chronicle)
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin


Posts : 6019
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Scruple   Tue Nov 19, 2013 2:35 pm

Word of the Day: Scruple


Scruple is the moral or ethical consideration that might inhibit certain actions in men. A politician without scruples, for instance, would be willing to do unethical things to achieve his goals. The adjective is scrupulous.


"He hates shedding innocent blood, a scruple hard to maintain while outfitting a young man with an explosive-filled suicide vest." (Washington Post)


"“The Financier” shocked America when it first came out, showing a central character, Frank Cowperwood (a composite of rapacious Gilded Age capitalists, like Collis Huntington, the brains behind Southern Pacific), who pursues money utterly without scruple." (Chicago Tribune)



Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
HelenWest



Posts : 1443
Join date : 2013-09-09
Age : 55
Location : West of the Mississippi

PostSubject: Re: Word of the Day -   Wed Nov 20, 2013 1:58 am

But the adjective for without scruples is unscrupulous. Now when did our boys grow scruples?
HW
Back to top Go down
Admin
Admin


Posts : 6019
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Trivial   Wed Nov 20, 2013 3:26 pm

Word of the Day: Trivial


Trivial is an adjective that means ordinary, common or of little value. It comes from the Latin word trivialis, which indicated the cross of public streets (i.e., something that can be found everywhere).


"Now that the Democrats are in power, dissent has suddenly and conveniently become unpatriotic. Attacks on disenchanted citizens who speak up at town-hall meetings have ranged from the trivial to the outrageous." (Denver Post)


"At first glance the battle for online buddies may seem somewhat trivial, but it has taken on renewed importance with the announcement that MySpace plans to hold the first virtual presidential primary." (Arizona Republic)

Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin


Posts : 6019
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Taxonomy   Thu Nov 21, 2013 4:38 pm

Word of the Day: Taxonomy

Taxonomy is the science of classification. It can also mean a systematic approach to arrange or classify a group of objects. Finally, sometimes taxonomy is used as a synonym to biology, the science that classifies animals, plants and organisms.


"Scientists at several Australian museums have begun the complex process of working with the samples for genetic barcoding and taxonomy, the formal system of naming living things." (USA Today)


"Market research generated four times more, and solution spotting seven times more successes than failures. But the clear winner in the innovation stakes was “taking advantage of random events”, which generated 13 times more successes than failures. Such a taxonomy is clearly a powerful tool for predicting winners." (The Economist)
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin


Posts : 6019
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Folksonomy   Fri Nov 22, 2013 2:15 pm

Word of the Day: Folksonomy


Folksonomy is a neologism formed with the words folk and taxonomy. It is the classification of online content based on user-generated tags. This classification can be the work of a single individual, but more often it refers to the cooperation among many individuals of a particular online service or community. One example of a folksonomy is the classification of the pictures on Flickr.com.


"In social tagging, users of a service provide the tags, or labels, that describe the content (of photos, Web links, art), thus creating a user-generated taxonomy, or folksonomy, as it’s called." (NY Times)

Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
HelenWest



Posts : 1443
Join date : 2013-09-09
Age : 55
Location : West of the Mississippi

PostSubject: Re: Word of the Day -   Sat Nov 23, 2013 12:07 am

Folksonomy - now that's one I've never heard before. Somehow, I can't picture Heyes or the Kid saying it. Maybe their great-great grand kids.
HW
Back to top Go down
Admin
Admin


Posts : 6019
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Inure   Sat Nov 23, 2013 7:15 am

Word of the Day: Inure


Inure means to harden or to accustom to some kind of hardship. For example, one could inure to cold or hunger.


"There is no policy, practice,procedure, piece of equipment or change in regimen that is going to completely inure us against madmen." (USA Today)


"Viewers inured to scenes of chaos can sometimes be moved by the disorienting sight of commonplace objects transformed by violence." (NY Times)



Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin


Posts : 6019
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Jettison   Sun Nov 24, 2013 8:43 am


Word of the Day: Jettison


Jettison is a verb that means to throw goods overboard to make a vessel in danger of wreck lighter or more stable. People often use it in a figurative sense, though, where it means to discard something.


"Near-bankruptcy is causing Cuba to jettison the Utopian paternalism of Che and Fidel." (The Economist)


"And so the Ford Motor Company has decided it is time to jettison its tagline of the last 17 years, ”Quality is job one.”" (NY Times)
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin


Posts : 6019
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Quintessence   Mon Nov 25, 2013 2:35 pm

Word of the Day: Quintessence


Quintessence is the most important part of anything. It can also mean the pure essence of a substance. The word comes from quinta essentia, which means fifth essence. The Greeks had four basic elements: water, air, earth and fire. Pythagoreans then added a fifth element to that, called nether. After that people started considering the fifth element, or fifth essence, the most important one.


"His most famous advertising campaign, for Arrow shirts and collars, which is still cited as a symbol of the flapper era, was the quintessence of stylishness and put the company on the fashion map." (NY Times)


"Those of us who fight for the integrity of our generation’s music point to “political” — as opposed to “party” and “gangsta” — rap as an example of its potential. Its quintessence was epitomized in the late 1980s during hip-hop’s “stop the violence movement.”" (USA Today)
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin


Posts : 6019
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Yearn   Tue Nov 26, 2013 4:24 pm

Word of the Day: Yearn



Yearn means to grieve or to have a strong desire or need for something. The noun yearning, similarly, refers to a longing or unfulfilled desire or need.


"But mostly, she puts away her subway book as she steps out of the train doors and yearns for a longer commute, something other reading riders admitted to yesterday." (NY Times)


"Instead, Wall Street told us that the solution was less regulation. Convinced it could shirk risk, it chafed at restriction, yearning to pursue reward without consequence." (Houston Chronicle)
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin


Posts : 6019
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Vernacular   Wed Nov 27, 2013 2:47 pm

Word of the Day: Vernacular


Vernacular, the noun, is the native language of a place. It can also refer to the everyday expressions used by people or to the vocabulary used inside a particular place or profession. The adjective means native or indigenous.


"“Super Freakonomics” also tiptoes around important public policy debates such as healthcare and doesn’t dare venture into any sort of policy prescriptions using the political vernacular of the day." (LA Times)


"The son of a farm labourer, Clare also wrote poetry on unrequited love, the sometimes fragile nature of his mental health – he was twice admitted to asylums – and described the natural world in his local vernacular rather than the standard English deployed by his Romantic peers." (The Guardian)
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin


Posts : 6019
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Oxymoron   Thu Nov 28, 2013 4:20 pm

Word of the Day: Oxymoron

An oxymoron is a figure of speech where incongruous or contradictory terms are combined. Two examples are “genuine imitation” and “deafening silence.”


"In response to ”Making E-ZPass Easier” (July 28), let’s not overlook the profound oxymoron of both the name and idea of New Jersey’s E-ZPass system and its out-of-state cousins." (NY Times)


"Sure, they’ll have to endure three or four hours in an “extended-range regional jet” — a flying oxymoron if there ever was one. But those folks don’t have to go through Dallas or Chicago or St. Louis to get to New York, and that means a lot." (WSJ)
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin


Posts : 6019
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Frantic   Fri Nov 29, 2013 2:25 pm

Word of the Day: Frantic

Frantic is an adjective that means desperate or frenzied. The adverb is frantically.


"They culminated a weekend of frantic around-the-clock negotiations, as Wall Street bankers huddled in meetings at the behest of Bush administration officials to try to avoid a downward spiral in the markets stemming from a crisis of confidence." (NY Times)


"The broader point is that frantic price-lowering will likely continue as long as the economy remains weak and business travel continues to contract." (The Economist)

Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin


Posts : 6019
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Ecumenical   Sat Nov 30, 2013 6:14 am

Word of the Day: Ecumenical


Ecumenical, which can also be spelled as ecumenic, is an adjective that means universal or general. Ecumenical is also used to describe things pertaining to or promoting the Christian church.


"Among the council’s key developments were its ecumenical outreach and the development of the New Mass in the vernacular, which essentially replaced the old Latin Mass." (USA Today)


"Brother Roger, the Swiss Protestant theologian who in 1940 founded a community of monks in Taizé, in eastern France, that became a worldwide ecumenical movement, died there on Tuesday." (NY Times)

Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin


Posts : 6019
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Debase   Sun Dec 01, 2013 7:16 am

Word of the Day: Debase


Debase is a verb that means to reduce the quality or value of something, or to lower the rank or dignity of someone.


"So the Pentagon contends that it has no choice but to exclude its sufferers from the Purple Heart, given to those whose injuries result from direct and intentional action by the enemy. Doing so would not debase the medal, as some defenders of the Purple Heart callously put it, but it would change it, perhaps in unintended and unwelcome ways." (NY Times)


"Why take real people who have been a source of inspiration for millions and debase them for the purpose of “entertainment”? Jack’s Widow elicits the same queasy sensation as reading a supermarket tabloid." (USA Today)

Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin


Posts : 6019
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Browbeat   Mon Dec 02, 2013 3:06 pm

Word of the Day: Browbeat


Browbeat means to intimidate or subjugate by the use of verbal harassment or force. A synonym to browbeat is to bully.


"If we follow the usual script, this means it’s time for upset listeners and viewers to rally to the cause, as they have in the past, and browbeat Congress into restoring the budget." (NY Times)


"European consumers are entitled to fear genetic modification in their own backyards, even if proper scientific debate is often drowned out by agitprop and railing against multinational corporations. But they have no right to browbeat the developing world into following their lead." (The Economist)
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin


Posts : 6019
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Browbeat   Tue Dec 03, 2013 2:28 pm

Word of the Day: Browbeat


Browbeat means to intimidate or subjugate by the use of verbal harassment or force. A synonym to browbeat is to bully.


"If we follow the usual script, this means it’s time for upset listeners and viewers to rally to the cause, as they have in the past, and browbeat Congress into restoring the budget." (NY Times)


"European consumers are entitled to fear genetic modification in their own backyards, even if proper scientific debate is often drowned out by agitprop and railing against multinational corporations. But they have no right to browbeat the developing world into following their lead." (The Economist)
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin


Posts : 6019
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Peripatetic   Wed Dec 04, 2013 2:10 pm

Word of the Day: Peripatetic


Peripatetic, the noun, is a person who walks or travels about. It can be used as an adjective as well, with the same meaning. The word makes allusion to Aristotle, who used to teach his philosophy while walking in the Lyceum.


"The youngest son, by 13 years, of rentier parents, Wilson was born at Bexhill-on-Sea on the south coast of England. His early years were peripatetic and insecure, mostly spent in private hotels and boardinghouses, a couple of steps ahead of the bailiffs." (NY Times)


"But rather too confining for its peripatetic creator, David de Rothschild, the 31-year-old eco-celebrity (and scion of Europe’s fabled banking family) whose mission is to forever change the way the world sees polyethylene terephthalate — aka plastic." (USA Today)

Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin


Posts : 6019
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Secular   Thu Dec 05, 2013 2:35 pm

Word of the Day: Secular


Secular is an adjective used to describe things or people that are not religious.


When Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani, the most influential Shiite cleric in Iraq, spoke out a week ago, calling for full national elections instead of the caucus-style balloting envisioned in the American plan for self-rule, most secular politicians concluded that he hoped the voters would elect a theocracy. (NY Times)


Residents of Jerusalem chose a secular businessman to lead one of the world’s most revered and complicated cities, putting an end to five years of ultra-Orthodox Jewish control, election results showed Wednesday. (USA Today)
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Admin
Admin


Posts : 6019
Join date : 2013-08-24

PostSubject: Word of the Day: Ecclesiastic   Fri Dec 06, 2013 7:00 am

Word of the Day: Ecclesiastic


Ecclesiastic is a person inside a religious order. The adjective, on other other hand, is ecclesiastical.


"Two centuries after Olaus Magnus, another ecclesiastic, the Danish missionary Hans Egede (who eventually became the bishop of Greenland), visited that icy island early in the eighteenth century, in hope of converting the natives to Christianity." (NY Times)


"Rome’s ecclesiastical tailors are seeing red these days, but they’re not complaining." (USA Today)
Back to top Go down
http://aliassmithandjones.canadian-forum.com
Sponsored content




PostSubject: Re: Word of the Day -   Today at 6:03 am

Back to top Go down
 
Word of the Day -
View previous topic View next topic Back to top 
Page 4 of 42Go to page : Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ... 23 ... 42  Next
 Similar topics
-
» The Word of Hashut #8
» Four word Nursery Rhyme
» A -Z one word movies or tv shows.
» Better Word for Scumbag?
» Sue's Word Challenge!

Permissions in this forum:You cannot reply to topics in this forum
Alias Smith and Jones Fun and Fanfiction  :: Writers Aids Feel free to contrubute to any of these threads :: Word of the Day - Feel free to contribute to this thread-
Jump to: